Frequently asked questions about Highway Public Notices

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The diversion route appears to be wrong or too long.

In most cases, the official diversion route will use the same classification of road as the road being closed (e.g. A, B, C or D road). Sometimes there are exceptions to this, for example where we know that a lower category road has enough capacity to
cope with the extra traffic volume.

Our engineers have carefully chosen the diversion route to take into consideration lots of factors including other diversions in the area.

While the works are taking place, our traffic management crew will constantly monitor the diversion and change it immediately if there are any problems. If you are concerned about any live diversions, please contact the highways service.

The notice shows the works could take 18 months, that it too long a time to close a road for maintenance work.

It will not take 18 months for us to do the work. We make a legal order for a wide window of time so that we can plan our works alongside all our other works.

The actual works will only take a fraction of this time. We haven't yet programmed this work and we will publish exact dates as soon as we know them, on our roadworks map.

You can sign up for email alerts on our roadworks map if you want to be kept informed.

It would help to know the exact dates and duration of the work.

The council makes a legal order for a wide window of time so that we can plan our works alongside all our other works. If we know how long the works will take or when we will be doing them, we will put this on our notice.

If the approximate dates are not specified on the notice, it is because we do not yet know the length or dates of the work.

We will publish exact dates and how long the work will take as soon as we know on our roadworks map.

You can sign up for email alerts on our road works map if you want to be kept informed.

I don't like the time you plan to do the work – it should be in the day, outside school pick up times or at night instead.

Our engineers have thought carefully about the timings of the work and there are good reasons why the times have been chosen. These are only anticipated times at the moment and the council's Streetworks team will have the final say when they grant the permit for us to work on the road. You can see the permit details nearer the work time on our roadworks map. Our map is directly linked to the permit database.

Unfortunately, whatever time we undertake our work it will have an impact on people, whether this is on traffic during the day or on residents trying to sleep at night. We try to minimise the effects our works have as much as possible.

Further information will be available on our roadworks map just before we do the work and you can sign up for email alerts if you want to be kept informed.

I want more information about what work you are doing, such as what 'patching' means.

We put as much information as possible on our notice, but we may not have further information for a while. If you want to find out more information about the specific work, you can find this on our roadworks map just before we start the work.

There are many different types of work that we do to the road, and we explain some of the treatments on our 'Maintaining our roads and pavements' page.

'Patching' is a generic name that we use for different types of road treatment that usually involves small patches of the road. However sometimes the word "patching" can mean we are replacing fairly large sections of the road as well.

You can't close the road here. There are already road works/an event nearby that will be affected.

The council's Streetworks team will only allow us to work at a time when it does not conflict with other things happening on the roads.

You can find out more information about the dates we plan to work nearer the time and sign up for email alerts from our roadworks map.