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The types of adoption

Each adoption is unique and built around the needs of the child. All adoptions involve permanently transferring parental responsibility from one or both birth parents to someone else. Some children are adopted after being placed with their new family by an adoption agency. In other cases adoption is a means of confirming a relationship that already exits and is known as non-agency adoption if an agency did not place the child.

There are various types of adoption and long term care arrangements:


Adopting a child in care

In this situation a local authority has looked after the child because they are unable to remain at home with their birth parents. In most cases a foster carer first cares for the child whilst plans for their future are made.

With fostering to adopt a child is placed with foster parents who are also approved as adopters. This means that the child does not have to move placements if they do not return to the care of their birth parents.

However the foster carers need to understand that the court may decide the child should return to the birth parents or other relative. They will also need to help the child maintain regular contact (often five times a week) with birth parents during the court process.

We are always keen to hear from anyone interested in being approved to foster and adopt. Please discuss this option at your Readiness to Adopt sessions.

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Adopting a stepchild

This enables a step parent to take on parental responsibility for the child usually resulting in sharing parental responsibility with their partner. The child would have the same legal status as any child born to (and registered at birth as the child of) the step parent. Parental responsibility is removed from the other birth parent.

Adoption by a step parent is a big step and not suitable in all cases especially if there is, or has been, a relationship between the child and the parent they do not live with. The step parent adoption process involves extensive checks and references to be carried out, including DBS checks. A social worker is allocated to complete an in depth assessment about the family. The views of the child and each birth parents are sought by a social worker, who makes a recommendation to the court, which makes the final decision. Alternative legal arrangements must be considered before the court is able to make an adoption order.

If you want to explore adopting your stepchild contact us on 01932 794347 between 2:30pm - 4:30pm (Monday - Friday) for information, advice on next steps and the answers to frequently asked questions.

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Adopting a relative or child you already know

You may want to adopt a child you know who cannot live with their birth parents. If we are looking after the child, we will need to assess you as an adopter, following our usual process and if you are caring for the child already, you will need to check whether this would be considered a private fostering arrangement.If you are considering adopting a child not being looked after by us or another local authority, you may be able to apply for an adoption order using the non-agency adoption process. A report is made to the court advising whether adoption would be right for the child. Please contact us for more information.

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Kinship carers or connected persons

There are various other legal arrangements for children not able to live with birth parents. For example, residence orders or special guardianship could enable you to care for a child whilst sharing parental responsibility with the child's birth parent(s).

It is important that you seek advice on which is the best arrangement for you and the child. Please contact us or seek independent legal advice from a solicitor experienced in family work.

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Private fostering

If a child's birth parent wants you to look after their child for more than 28 days and you are not a close relative, you must register this with us as a private fostering arrangement. In this arrangement the parental responsibility for the child remains with the birth parents who delegate day-to-day decisions to you.

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Adopting a child from overseas

Although the initial process for adopting a child from overseas is broadly similar to adopting a child in the UK, there are some extra stages and you will also need to meet criteria set in the child's country of origin. You will have to pay all charges connected to the process, which can be substantial.

Each country has its own adoption processes and you will need to find out what these are and also check whether the adoption order from a particular country is recognised in the UK. In some cases, you will need to apply to the UK courts following your return to the UK and a qualifying period. Some countries also require reports to be provided by an approved social work agency after the child has been placed for adoption oversees. The adoptive parent(s) must pay for this.

Many people think it is possible to adopt a younger child or one with fewer medical or emotional needs, than available in the UK. This is not always the case and you should carefully research the countries possible to adopt from and the needs of the children available for adoption.

If you are domiciled or habitually resident in the UK and hope to adopt and bring a child to the UK you must first seek approval from a recognized UK adoption agency. You must follow this process even if you are a UK based foreign national, planning to adopt from your own county or the child is a relative. If you don't you could be prosecuted.

Surrey Children's Services does not provide an assessment service for prospective adopters seeking to adopt overseas. The Inter Country Adoption Service (ICA) now carries this out on our behalf.

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