Skip to main content

Help with reporting a highway problem

If you are reporting an emergency, or an issue that's dangerous, then please call our contact centre on 0300 200 1003.

Emergencies

Definition and examples of reports that are considered an emergency

A report or defect that requires an immediate response is one that has a high risk of vehicle/pedestrian interaction with the likely result of serious or even fatal consequences.

Examples of what are considered to be emergency situations that would require an immediate response

  • Road collapse
  • Landslide resulting in part or the entire road being impassable
  • Structure collapse (e.g. bridge, wall, fences, scaffolds, hoarding)
  • Street Furniture collapse e.g. road signs and other street furniture damaged to such an extent that they have become a direct danger or obstruction to the travelling public - e.g. bent into the path of vehicles
  • Missing manhole/gully cover
  • Road traffic accidents resulting in debris or oil on the carriageway
  • Vehicle fire on carriageway
  • Debris e.g. shed load
  • Large dead animals e.g. cattle/deer/horse causing obstruction. Please note that this does not apply if the road is passable; e.g. small animals not causing obstruction, or fly-tipping on verge
  • Oil or paint spills
  • Toxic or hazardous material or spill
  • Fallen tree, branch or lamp column blocking part or the entire carriageway
  • Unlit skip during hours of darkness
  • Exposed electrical wires e.g. cover missing from lamp column
  • Extensive flooding resulting in road being impassable, or flood presenting high risk of damage to property or danger to public. Please note: This does not include burst pipes or water mains, which should be dealt with by the water utility – Thames Water or Southern Water depending on the area in which the flood is located
  • Road openings, left unguarded or unprotected, presenting a potential danger to the public
  • Traffic signals (temporary or permanent) that are not working

If you are unsure and need advice on whether you think its an emergency situation, please call this number 0300 200 1003

Potholes

If you report a problem online, we will inspect it within five days.

We have a responsibility for the maintenance and repair of most roads in Surrey, including pavements, but we are not responsible for:

  • Private roads
    These are the responsibility of the residents of each private road.
  • Trunk roads and motorways that cross Surrey (A3, M23, M3 and M25).
    Any issues and questions about the A3, M23, M3 and M25, should be directed to Highways England.

Report a pothole

The level of response is dependent on the location, size and risk the pothole poses to public safety. This may result in the pothole either:

  • being repaired within 28 days if it is identified as a safety risk; or
  • being repaired as part of other programmed works; or
  • being monitored as part of the routine inspections programme as the risk to public safety is not sufficient to merit any action.

Please report one problem at a time, you will be given an opportunity at the end to report another problem using the personal details previously entered.

Upgrade to Pothole map

We have upgraded our reporting map so that you can now see the locations where a pothole has already been reported, inspected or repaired.

All red circular icons on the map show a pothole which is awaiting inspection or repair. All green triangular icons show a pothole which has been assessed and fixed (where applicable). You can click on the icons to find out further information about the pothole. If you're satisfied that we're already aware of the pothole you're concerned about, there is no need to re-report it. You can still report new potholes to us.

Please note that the map is not updated in real time, and it may take up to 24 hours for it to display any newly reported, or newly fixed potholes.

Questions on the reporting form

Which part of the road describes the problem?

  • Footpath (also called the footway)
    The area alongside the road for pedestrians to walk on.
  • Kerbside
    The outermost edge of the pavement.
  • Cycle lane
    The part of the road nearest the kerb provided for cyclists. This is sometimes coloured differently to the road.
  • Driving line
    The part of road along which your vehicle drives. If you would need to steer away from your driving line to avoid the defect, then choose this option.
  • Centre of road
    The centre of the road is the area between the carriageways where white lines are normally painted. There is one centre of road per road.

Roughly what size is the pothole?

  • Smaller than a golf ball - this is a pothole less than 2cm (0.8 inches) deep.
  • Larger than a golf ball but smaller than a tennis ball - this is a pothole deeper than 2cm (0.8 inches) but less than 2.5cm (1 inch) deep
  • Larger than a tennis ball but smaller than a football - this is a pothole deeper than 2.5cm (1 inch) but less than 4cm (1.6 inches) deep and wider than 7.5 cm (3 inches)
  • Larger than a football - this is a pothole deeper than 4cm (1.6 inches) and wider than 15cm (6 inches)

If none of the above, is the surface breaking up?

  • Yes, the road surface is breaking up - only use this option if the road surface is worn in multiple locations and there are no potholes that need repair.
  • No, the road surface looks solid - use this option if you are reporting a contained patch of worn carriageway but the surrounding surface appears solid and there are no potholes that need repair.

Road condition

Use this option to report worn, cracked or damaged road surfaces. There is a separate option for reporting potholes.

Report a damaged road surface

Report a pothole

Questions on the reporting form

Where is the problem?

  • Kerbside
    The kerbside is the outermost edge of the pavement.
  • Cycle lane
    The cycle lane, where provided, is the part of the road nearest the kerb provided for cyclists. This is sometimes coloured differently to the road.
  • Driving line
    The driving line is the part of road along which your vehicle drives. If you would need to steer away from your driving line to avoid the defect, then choose this option.
  • Centre of road
    The centre of the road is the area between the carriageways where white lines are normally painted. There is one centre of road per road.

What's the problem with the road surface?

  • Breaking up – is the surface broken away in areas?
  • Cracked – is the surface cracked?
  • Uneven – is the surface bumpy in areas?
  • Excessive smoothness – has the surface got an almost shiny finish on it?
  • Edge of road damaged outside of white line – has the road broken away outside of the white line nearest the verge?
  • Edge of road damaged inside of white line – has the road broken inside of the white line?
  • Significant amount of loose material – if the surface has broken away, is there loose material (stones, broken tarmac etc) on the surface?

Any other information box

Please can you give details as to the extent of the problem or area affected

Drains

If you report a problem online, we will inspect it within five days.

Report a blocked drain

Report a broken drain

Report flooding

Questions on the reporting form for blocked drains

Are you able to say what's causing the blockage?

  • Rubbish/leaves
    Leaves can collect after heavy rainfall and often block drains. Rubbish can also cause a problem if its not removed.
  • Silt or soil - This can sometimes run into a drain and cause a blockage.

Questions on the reporting form for broken drains

How deep or protruding is the ironwork?

  • If it has sunken, has it sunk less than 20mm (which is smaller than the height of a 50p piece).
  • If it is sticking up, is it greater than 25mm (bigger than a 50p piece)?

What is the problem with the drain?

  • Loose or rocking - Is the drain loose from the frame causing it to rock?
  • Broken, protruding and/or sunken - Is the cover broken and sticking up, or has it sunken so that it's below the edge of the pavement, road or cycle lane?
  • If a drain cover is missing and there is an immediate danger to road users or pedestrians please call 0300 200 103.

Any other Information box

  • Please use this box to tell us of any further information, for example how long has it been a problem for pedestrians or road users.

Flooding

Report flooding

Report a blocked drain

Questions on the reporting form

Where about on the road is the flood?

  • Footpath
  • Cycle lane
  • Part of road
  • Whole lane - One lane of the road is flooded
  • All of road - Both sides of the road are flooded

What is the cause of the flood?

  • Not sure
  • River, stream, canal - A river, stream or canal which has burst or is overflowing
  • Blocked ditch - A long narrow trench in the ground, which acts as irrigation, drainage or as a boundary line.
  • Blocked drain - This would normally be found at the edge of the road nearest the kerb.
  • Run off from private or farm land
  • Property down-pipe - This would be visible on private property.

Any other Information box

  • Please use this box to tell us of any further information, for example the size or depth of the flooding, or how long it has been a problem for pedestrians/road users.

Grit bins

Report a missing or damaged grit bin

Surrey County Council has responsibility for the grit bins highlighted in blue on the interactive map. All other grit bins that are visible on the highway, but not shown on the map, are privately owned either by residents or parishes.

If the grit bin is empty, or if you would like to request a new grit bin, please see the grit bins page for further information.

Questions on the reporting form

  • When reporting a damaged grit bin, please locate the bin number (if possible) which should be visible on the bin.
  • Please describe the type of damage eg. lid missing, large crack causing grit to spill out etc.

Lines

We have a rolling programme to refresh all road lines, so please only report a faded give way or stop line.

Report a problem with a road line

Questions on the reporting form

Type of line affected

  • Double white line - a solid double white line, usually in the centre of the carriageway.
  • Give way line - a dashed white line, usually found at a road  junction.
  • The stop line - a solid white line at a junction.

Any other information box

  • Please use this box to provide any other relevant information about the lines.

Ironwork

If you can easily identify that the cover belongs to a utility company please do not report it here.

Please use the customer contacts for utility companies (PDF) to select the correct contact details for the responsible company.

Report a problem with ironwork

Questions on the reporting form

Location of problem

  • Footpath (also called the pavement or footway)
    This is the area alongside the road for pedestrians to walk on.
  • Cycle Lane
    Where provided, this is the part of the road nearest the kerb provided for cyclists. It is sometimes coloured differently from the road.
  • Road (also called the carriageway)

What is the problem with the ironwork?

  • Loose and rocking - Is the cover loose from the frame causing it to rock?
  • Broken, protruding and/or sunken - Is the cover broken and sticking up, or has it sunken so that it's below the edge of the pavement, road or cycle lane?

How deep or protruding is the ironwork?

  • Is the cover sunken into the ground or is it sticking up? Has it sunken below the surface by less than 20mm which is the height of a 50p piece or if its sticking up is greater than 25mm, bigger than a 50p piece?

Further information text box

  • Please use this box to tell us of any further information, for example the size or depth of the ironwork or how long it has been a problem for pedestrians/road users.
  • Please do not use this box to report other highway issues - these need to be recorded separately.

Pavements

Report a pavement problem

Questions on the reporting form

Where is the problem?

  • Footpath (also called the footway) - The area alongside the road for pedestrians to walk on.
  • Kerbside - The outermost edge of the pavement.
  • Cycle lane
  • Where provided, this is the part of the road nearest the kerb provided for cyclists. This is sometimes coloured differently from the road.
  • Verge - Often grass (but not always) and runs alongside the road or footpath.

How deep or protruding is the problem?

  • If it has sunken, has it sunk less than 20mm (smaller than the height of a 50p piece)?
  • If it is sticking up, is greater than 25mm (bigger than the height of a 50p piece)?

What is the problem with the pavement?

  • Loose / rocking
  • Damaged
  • Missing

What type of pavement or kerb is it?

  • Cobbles - a naturally rounded small stone, commonly found in pedestrianised areas.
  • Tarmac - black asphalt, which is most commonly used to surface roads and footpaths.
  • Block paving/slabs - large squares usually made of concrete, but can also have the appearance of brickwork.
  • Unmade - fairly uncommon but made up of scalpings or stone.
  • Concrete kerb - grey stones normally at the edge of the road, next to the pavement.
  • Granite set - a rumble strip of granite blocks set in the road, usually at the entrance of a residential area to act as traffic calming.
  • Tactile paving - often referred to as blister paving, its used to assist visually impaired people to warn of a danger ahead. Usually seen at crossing points.

Is it on private property?

  • Are you able to identify if its on a private forecourt or driveway?

Further information text box

  • Please give us as much information as possible about the location and the extent of the damaged area.

Vegetation

The level of response is dependent on the location, size and risk the tree poses to public safety. 

This may result in the tree being either:

  • inspected within 28 days;
  • being monitored as part of the routine inspection programme; or
  • being included on a work programme in response to the enquiry and subsequent inspection.

Report overgrown trees or vegetation

If you have any questions, please check our frequently asked questions about trees and vegetation.

Questions on the reporting form

Where is the problem?

  • Footpath
  • Verge
  • Cycle lane
  • Kerbside
  • Road
  • Central reservation

What is the problem with the vegetation?

  • Is it causing an obstruction?
  • Is the tree or vegetation making it difficult to use the footpath, are you having to step into the road to avoid the tree or vegetation?
  • Is it obscuring a sight line?
  • When pulling out of a road junction does the tree or vegetation block your vision, making it difficult to have clear sight of oncoming traffic?Is it obscuring a sign?
  • Is the tree or vegetation covering or partly covering the sign making it difficult to see?
  • Is the tree or vegetation damaging the footpath or road?
  • Are there visible tree roots coming up through the path or road which could cause a hazard?
  • Is there a danger of a tree or branch falling?
  • Is there a large tree branch or tree about to break, which would cause a problem for pedestrian or road user?

Is it on private property?

  • Are you are able to establish where the growth is coming from?
  • Does it look to be growing or hanging over from someone's property/garden or does it appear to be on highway land (grass verge etc)?

Further information text box

  • Please use this box to advise us of any further information for example the size of the vegetation (height etc) and how long has it been a problem for pedestrians/road users.
  • Updated: 11 Oct 2017

Top