Planning Service Annual Monitoring Report 2020/21

Contents

Introduction

Content of the report

This Annual Monitoring Report (AMR) reviews the effectiveness of planning policy implementation and service delivery with a focus on the year April 2020 to March 2021. In this regard it provides a comprehensive review of the work of the Planning Service and how its different teams add value to Surrey.

The report assesses progress in preparing Surrey's minerals and waste local development documents. It also measures the performance of the adopted development documents against their strategic objectives and Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). Data is provided to support these assessments from minerals and waste planning applications and decisions, monitoring and enforcement activity, and progress with the restoration of mineral sites.

Progress against the Key Performance Indicators is reported using a 'traffic light' system:

PhraseMeaning
Target Met Target Met.
On track Some issue with delivery but on track to meet target.
Improvements required Target not met and improvements required to meet target.

This year's AMR does not contain maps of minerals and waste sites as these are now available on Surrey County Council's website but it does contain a list of active mineral and waste sites in Appendix 3. Detailed information and analysis relating to policy implementation has been summarised and included within the minerals and waste chapters.

It should be noted that during the monitoring period reported in this AMR (April 2020 to March 2021), the Surrey Waste Plan 2008 (SWP 2008) was still part of the Development Plan. On 8 December 2020, Surrey County Council adopted the Surrey Waste Local Plan 2019 – 2033 (SWLP). Consequently, planning applications determined between April 2020 and December 2020 were assessed against the SWP 2008. The next AMR (April 2021 to March 2022) will review the effectiveness of policy implementation and service delivery in relation to the SWLP.

Adding value

Supporting the minerals industry

The minerals industry is a key enabling sector of the UK economy, making up the largest element of the construction supply chain and supplying materials to other industries. Minerals and other aggregates are essential to the building of homes, commercial and industrial buildings, schools, and hospitals as well as utility and transport network improvements. For illustration purposes, it is estimated that the minerals industry (excluding oil and gas) contributed over £5.8 billion in Gross Value Added (GVA) in 2018 [footnote 1] and provided direct employment of around 81,000 people. The annual turnover for the Minerals and Minerals Products Industry in the UK for 2018 was £16 billion.

Surrey County Council's Planning Service supports Surrey's economy and the minerals industry through preparing and maintaining an up-to-date minerals local plan and by positive and proactive development management. Benefits of this approach include:

  • Facilitating a steady supply of minerals that are vital to the UK economy;
  • Safeguarding mineral resources and infrastructure from other forms of development;
  • Enabling the identification and potential exploitation of oil and gas energy resources thereby facilitating the process of transition to a clean energy future.

Approximately 251 million tonnes of primary and recycled aggregates were produced in the UK during 2018 [footnote 1]. The industry (excluding oil and gas) directly contributed over £5.8 billion in GVA to the economy in 2018 and provided direct employment of around 81,000 people. The annual turnover for the Minerals and Mineral Products Industry in the UK for 2018 was £16 billion.

Supporting the waste management industry

The UK's waste management industry was valued at approximately £7 billion in 2013 and supports 103,000 jobs [footnote 2]. These figures rise to £41 billion in value and 672,000 jobs if you include opportunities in repair, reuse and leasing activity that are associated with extending the life of products.

The value that can be extracted from waste has increased in recent years. The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) has reported an increase in Gross Value Added (GVA) per tonne of waste managed in the UK from £32 to £43 between 2004 and 2012. The UK waste industry is growing at a faster rate than the wider economy.

However, the waste management industry continues to face some uncertainty as a result of Brexit including fluctuating prices and changes in environmental and waste management legislation, regulations and policy, much of which originated from the European Union.

Surrey County Council's Planning Service supports the economy and the waste management industry through preparing and maintaining an up-to-date waste local plan and by positive and proactive development management. Benefits of this approach include:

  • Facilitating the provision of the right types of waste management facilities in the right place and at the right time;
  • Increased resource efficiency;
  • New growth and employment opportunities from an expanding re-use, repair, recycling and re-manufacturing sector.

Helping to deliver schools and other infrastructure

Surrey County Council determines applications for its own development [footnote 3]. Its Development Management Team in the Planning Service is responsible for assessing planning applications relating to the County Council's own development, including the delivery of its school expansion programme and other developments including transport infrastructure, facilities for adult social care and fire stations. The team also provides detailed pre-application advice relating to these proposals ensuring that all relevant planning issues are addressed at the earliest possible stage, minimising the risk of delay to planning decisions and infrastructure provision.

In 2020/2021 during the Coronavirus Pandemic the Planning Service had to quickly adapt to ensure all of its services could be accessed online, as officers were required to work remotely for most of this period. This adaption was achieved speedily and efficiently, and the Development Management Team continued to be very busy providing pre-application advice and dealing with planning applications for a mixture of new developments, some of which are summarised in the table below:

DevelopmentSite
New Fire Station Fordbridge, Ashford
Enhanced outdoor recreation facilities for SOLD use Henley Fort, Guildford
3G community use pitch Glebelands School, Cranleigh
Temporary community facilities for Surrey Choices Former Longmead Adult Education site
Large permanent extensions to existing schools

Including:

  • St Pauls Catholic College
  • Tadworth Primary School
  • Ash Manor School
  • Oakwood School
Temporary modular installations to existing schools to cater for emergency intakes

Including:

  • Westvale Primary School
  • Former John Nightingale School for Cobham Free School
  • Freemantles School
Minor applications at schools to retain buildings or add structures like canopies

Including:

  • Brooklands School
  • The Oakwood School
  • Beacon Hill Community School
  • Meath Green Infant School
  • Claygate Primary School
  • Town Farm Primary School
  • Kingfield School
  • Epsom Primary School
  • Ongar Place Primary School
Pre-application advice for various developments

Including:

  • Salvation Place traveller site - utility block
  • Sycamore Centre, Epsom - assisted living
  • Shaw Centre, Woking - contact centre
  • Ashley Centre - assisted living
  • Bishop Wand School - extension
  • Guildford Adult Learning Centre - extension
  • Woodhatch, Reigate - use for Surrey County Council

Towards the end of 2020/21, the Development Management Team worked with the education service on several new facilities for pupils with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) across the county. In the past five years, there has been a significant rise in demand for specialist places for pupils with Complex Social Communication Needs (CSCN) and Autism. Surrey County Council is committed to a major new programme which will improve the outcomes for young people and reduce the number of SEND pupils who will need to be placed in schools within the Non-Maintained and Independent sector.

All planning proposals are determined in accordance with the relevant planning policies of the District/Borough within which the development is located. Development Management Officers therefore need to be familiar with the planning policies and plan-proposals of the 11 individual Districts and Boroughs in Surrey. Planning applications always include consideration of a number of issues which need to be taken into account and balanced, including the interests of the local community. Issues such as traffic, ecology, heritage, Green Belt, amenity of neighbours, noise and flood risk will often arise during the consideration and determination of planning applications.

Many of the planning permissions issued by Surrey County Council will be subject to conditions requiring further details to be submitted to and approved by Surrey County Council. These may cover a wide range of issues including measures to manage traffic impacts, deliver landscape and ecological mitigation, protect against flood risk and secure use of sustainable construction and drainage techniques. A significant element of the team's work has therefore been to ensure the monitoring of these conditions, ensuring the submission of the details required, and the processing of the resulting applications.

Protecting Surrey's environment

Surrey as a county offers a rich and diverse array of landscapes and hosts a variety of habitat types. Geology, landform, land use and climate combine to determine the vegetation cover of the different parts of the county, which, in turn, creates specific landscape types, such as heathland, woodland and chalk grassland.

Surrey is host to two Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONBs), which are landscapes of national importance, comprising the whole of the Surrey Hills AONB, and part of the High Weald AONB. In total seven distinct landscape character types are encountered across the county, including the Thames Valley character type, the Thames Basin Heaths character type, the Thames Basin Lowlands character type, the North Downs character type, the Wealden Greensand character type, the Low Weald character type, and the High Weald character type.

Surrey also hosts numerous areas that have been designated for protection because of their nature conservation interest. At an international level the county hosts two Ramsar Sites, and at a European level three Special Areas of Conservation (SACs) and four Special Protection Areas (SPAs). At a national level the county hosts three National Nature Reserves (NNRs) and sixty-three Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSIs). At a county level, there are nearly 800 Sites of Nature Conservation Importance (SNCIs).

Surrey is a popular place to live and work with a vibrant and diverse economy, which can lead to competing demands for land, particularly around the county's numerous settlements. For the planning system a key challenge is achieving a balance between the protection of sensitive and irreplaceable environmental assets, and the needs of the community and the economy for physical development.

Surrey County Council has statutory duties covering the environmental assessment of projects and plans. Consequently, Surrey County Council's Planning and Environment Teams brought together expertise on development planning, ecology, landscape and environmental assessment.

Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is required for certain types of development. Surrey County Council responds to screening opinion requests which determine if EIA is required, scoping opinion requests which define the scope of the information to be provided where EIA is needed and evaluates the quality of submitted Environmental Statements. The information set out in Environmental Statements is considered when planning decisions are made in relation to planning applications for 'EIA development'.

Strategic Environmental Assessments (SEAs) and Sustainability Appraisals (SAs) are required to support the preparation of development documents, including those covering minerals and waste management development. SEAs may also be required for other Surrey County Council plans and strategies such as local transport plans and local flood risk management strategies. Further areas of work include the preparation of SEA screening and scoping reports, the SEA and SA of emerging plans and preparation of the associated reports, and the preparation of post-adoption statements.

Subject to capacity, Surrey County Council makes its environmental assessment service available to other Local Planning Authorities (LPAs). To date services provided have included EIA screening support and advice, Environmental Statement reviews, officer training, and bespoke advice on EIA and SEA/SA matters.

Surrey County Council's ecology and landscape specialists seek to protect and enhance Surrey's environment working with partners in the following ways:

  • Commenting on and assessing planning applications submitted to Surrey County Council and providing advice on the policies proposed for inclusion in the development documents prepared by Surrey County Council, and by district and borough councils in Surrey. This advice enables the planning authorities to make decisions based on expert advice and up-to-date information.
  • Providing advice and guidance to Surrey County Council planning officers and to applicants on the information required to make decisions, together with the formats, templates and standards that should be used such Ecological Impact Assessments (EcIA) and Landscape and Ecology Management Plans (LEMPs).
  • Working with the Biodiversity Working Group of the Surrey Nature Partnership to produce and implement Biodiversity Opportunity Area (BOA) policy statements and policies and procedures for the identification and selection of Sites of Nature Conservation Importance (SNCIs) in Surrey.
  • Working with Surrey's district and borough councils and other partners to conduct surveys of Surrey including the revision of the Ancient Woodland Inventory and a Landscape Character Assessment [footnote 4];
  • Working with Surrey's district and borough councils to survey and identify Sites of Nature Conservation Importance (SNCIs) and collect data on the state of these for the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) as part of the Single Data List [footnote 5]. The results for the last reporting round in September 2018 found 49% of SNCIs were in positive management, the same as the previous year, although there were some changes in the qualifying sites.
  • Responding to consultations on matters including Biodiversity Net Gain and Conservation Covenants.
  • Three Surrey County Council owned spaces, at Bisley Common, Valley End (Chobham Place Woods) and Little Heath Common, have been designated Suitable Alternative Natural Greenspaces (SANGs) enabling housing development in the Thames Basin Heaths area and enhancing site management and the visitor experience.

Policies in the Surrey Minerals Plan and the Surrey Waste Local Plan help to protect the environment and communities from adverse impacts from minerals and waste management development. Protection is also added through monitoring and enforcing planning conditions imposed on mineral and waste management planning permissions and acting against breaches of planning control.

Valuing Surrey's heritage

Surrey has many heritage assets that require careful stewardship. Working to preserve and enhance Surrey's historic environment, Surrey County Council's Historic Environment Planning Team provides advice, guidance, and support to help create a positive resident and visitor experience of Surrey, maintain a sense of local distinctiveness and belonging, and to encourage businesses and tourists to the county. The team also administers and maintains the county Historic Environment Record, and provides expert advice to Surrey's planning authorities, developers, archaeological contractors and other stakeholders.

Although it is difficult to measure precisely, during 2020 and despite the national Coronavirus protocols and lockdowns, Surrey's district and borough councils registered around 22,000 applications, with nearly 1,000 archaeological consultations being made to Surrey's Historic Environment officers who in turn made 341 subsequent recommendations for archaeological work to be carried out. This means that around 4.5% of all Surrey planning applications involved potential archaeological concerns, but only just over 1.5% received a recommendation for a planning condition to be imposed on a planning permission or were informed that there was the need for further archaeological consideration. Discussion nationally has often characterised archaeological work as possibly being onerous to developers, but these figures indicate that Surrey operates a low-impact and well-targeted system for screening and identifying archaeological issues within the planning process.

To ensure compliance with the National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) information requirements, Surrey's Historic Environment team's review of the 1990 local archaeological designations was completed in 2017 and distributed to the district and borough councils.

As a result, 2.5% of Surrey is now covered by an archaeological designation – an increase from the previous 1.8% which is largely the result of having better and more complete historic environment information than in 1990. This should mean that the planning system in Surrey will be even more proficient at identifying archaeological risks for developers. Work has already commenced on a timetabled review of these areas, which is due in 2022.

Surrey's Historic Environment team also continues to provide advice services to two local planning authorities in West Sussex, which has been ongoing since 2015. During 2020 the team was successful in securing nearly £70,000 of funding from the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities (DLUHC) to update and revise the Local Lists of six district and borough partner authorities. Local Lists usually comprise a list of built heritage assets that are of local character, but which may not meet the highly stringent criteria necessary for national designation. The Local Listing Project to be carried out during 2021-2022 will enhance these lists and for the first time will include assets of community value, as well as those with archaeological, cultural and historic significance.

For further information relating to the work that is carried out by Surrey's Historic Environment team.

Case study: Linden Farm, Alfold

An Archaeological evaluation was conducted at Linden Farm, Alfold prior to the construction by Surrey County Council of a supported living complex for young adults with autism. This work revealed medieval or early post-medieval activity including a number of substantial ditches.

Subsequent investigation showed that the area had been heavily terraced and initially, only ephemeral traces of pits and gullies were recorded with the sparse amount of pottery recovered suggesting a medieval date. During deeper excavations required to facilitate drainage works the extent of the large ditches recorded during the evaluation was further revealed. Water ingress and the limited nature of the excavations made detailed archaeological excavation and recording difficult but the ditches, when planned, formed a sub-rectangular ringwork measuring c 45m north--south, x 45m east--west. Dendrochronological (tree-ring) analysis of structural timbers recovered from the base of the ditches produced felling dates in the early 12th century. Pottery dates confirm significant activity at that period, although modern truncation appears to have removed much of the primary occupation evidence.

Extrapolated data from the archaeological work, can, with a slightly lesser degree of confidence, be used to postulate a second substantial enclosure ditch or bailey attached to or enclosing an area on the western side of the ringwork. The combined evidence suggests that the investigations have revealed a previously unknown Norman ringwork and bailey castle site that initial documentary research suggests lay within 'Alfold', a detached portion of the Domesday Book estate of Shalford, held by Robert de Watteville. Such structures were the precursors to the larger and more familiar castles that the Norman conquerors erected in the immediate aftermath of 1066 to consolidate their victory. The strategically significant sites went on the be converted into formidable fortified complexes. Others fell rapidly out of use, with the site at Alfold appearing to be one of these latter examples that had since passed into obscurity, as the structure appears to have been relatively short-lived. The site is now preserved beneath the completed assisted living development.

Footnotes

[Footnote 1] Minerals Product Association (2020) Profile of the UK Minerals Products Industry.

[Footnote 2] Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) (2015) 'Resource management: a catalyst for growth', London, UK

[Footnote 3] Under Regulation 3 of the Town & Country Planning General Regulations 1992.

[Footnote 4] In 2016/2017 the Surrey Landscape Character Assessment was used as the landscape evidence base for reviewing a number of Local Plans and the Surrey Waste Local Plan.

[Footnote 5] SDL 160-00 Proportion of local sites where positive conservation management is being or has been implemented.

Policy

Development plan documents

Surrey County Council's full set of Development Plan Documents (DPDs) comprise:

The Surrey Waste Local Plan 2019-2033 (SWLP) and the Surrey Minerals Plan 2011 (SMP) provide certainty for the minerals and waste management industries, for local communities and the wider business community, by identifying suitable locations for minerals or waste development throughout the county.

The Surrey Waste Local Plan 2019-2033 (SWLP), the Surrey Minerals Plan Core Strategy, Primary Aggregates and Aggregates Recycling DPDs (collectively referred to as the Surrey Minerals Plan 2011 (SMP)) provide certainty to the minerals and waste management industries, local communities and other stakeholders, by identifying suitable locations for minerals or waste management development throughout the county.

The SWLP covers the plan period of 2019-2033. The plan helps to ensure that the future waste needs of Surrey can be appropriately met through waste management facilities situated in the most suitable locations and with minimal impact on communities and the environment.

Up to date development documents are essential in order to provide a robust policy framework to facilitate the sustainable supply of minerals and management of waste. Minerals and waste local plans must be positively prepared to facilitate economic development in an environmentally acceptable manner.

Other local development plan documents

In addition to the above policy documents the following are also included in what is known collectively as the Minerals and Waste Development Framework (MWDF):

Emerging policy

Surrey County Council as the Minerals and Waste Planning Authority (MWPA) is required to update development plans to ensure that they contain robust and effective policy.

During 2020/21 preparatory work was initiated in respect of Surrey's first joint Minerals and Waste Local Plan (MWLP). This plan will provide a development framework for both minerals and waste management development. It was decided to produce a joint plan so that strategic issues can be addressed in a manner that considers cross-discipline synergies and provides for policy consistency where appropriate and other efficiencies.

The first formal phase of preparing the MWLP – the Issues and Options Public Consultation – commenced in November 2021 and closed in March 2022. The next step in preparing the MWLP will be the Preferred Options Public consultation (Draft Plan) within the timescales set by Surrey County Council's Minerals and Waste Development Scheme.

Minerals and waste development scheme

The latest Minerals and Waste Development Scheme (MWDS) was agreed on 24 November 2020. The MWDS is Surrey County Council's public statement of its programme for preparing policy documents.

Statement of community involvement

Surrey County Council's Statement of Community Involvement (SCI) outlines how the MWPA will involve the local community and other stakeholders in the preparation of minerals and waste plans for Surrey. The document also sets out how the council will involve communities and other stakeholders in determining applications for minerals, waste management, and Surrey County Council's own development. The current SCI was adopted in October 2019.

Footnotes

[Footnote 6] The requirement for Mineral Planning Authorities to prepare a Local Aggregate Assessment stems from guidance set out in paragraph 213 of the National Planning Policy Framework (2021).

Duty to cooperate and working in partnership

Introduction

This chapter outlines Surrey County Council's cooperation with other planning authorities and public bodies to address strategic cross-boundary issues and to fulfil the Minerals and Waste Planning Authorities statutory Duty to Cooperate (DtC) obligations.

The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) July 2021, paragraphs 24-27 provide more detail around the DtC [footnote 7].

Duty to cooperate

As part of fulfilling the DtC, the MWPA participates in a number of officer and technical working groups that meet on a regular basis. At the Surrey-wide level these groups include:

  • Surrey Planning Officers' Association (SPOA) which brings together senior officers to deal with a range of planning issues that have cross-boundary impacts and to explore opportunities for joint working.
  • Surrey Development Managers' Group which focuses on development management practice and the interpretation of policy.
  • Planning Working Group (PWG) which deals with cross-boundary policy issues and prepares joint responses to consultations of Surrey-wide interest including changes to national planning policy and on the London Plan. Surrey County Council provide the secretariat for this group.

At the national, regional, and sub-regional level the groups include:

  • The South East Waste Planning Advisory Group (SEWPAG) which aims "to help waste planning authorities in the area to fulfil the Duty to Cooperate on strategic issues enshrined in the Localism Bill….". The MWPA is the budget holder for this group.
  • The South East England Aggregates Working Party (SEEAWP) which advises the Government, mineral planning authorities and the minerals industry on mineral planning issues. SEEAWP provides a forum for cooperation across regional boundaries to address aggregate supply issues in the southeast.
  • Planning Officers Society (POS) where the MWPA contribute to and participate in various groups at national and regional level.
  • The County Enforcement Officers Group (CEOG) which enables discussions on waste and mineral enforcement issues with speakers from partner organisations.
  • Wider South East Officer Working Group which supports the Wider South East Summits and Wider South East Political Steering Group to collaborate on strategic planning policy and investment across London, East of England, and the South East.
  • Heathrow Strategic Planning Group (HSPG) which brings together local authorities and Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEPs) in the Heathrow sub-region. A non-statutory Joint Spatial Planning Framework was produced in 2020.
  • Gatwick Diamond Local Authority Planning Officers which brings together local authorities in the Gatwick Diamond and enables discussion on shared and cross-boundary planning and infrastructure matters.

As part of the process of constructive and active engagement, the Minerals and Waste Planning Authority also responds to DtC consultations from other minerals and waste planning authorities. Details for 2020/21 are provided in Table 1.

Strategic planning

In July 2014, Surrey Leader's Group agreed to establish a Strategic Planning and Infrastructure Partnership to facilitate joint working across the county to address strategic issues and deliver on strategic priorities. The Partnership agreed Interim Local Strategic Statement for Surrey 2016 - 2031 (PDF) (LSS) in February 2018 following consultation with partners. In recognition of changes to national planning policy since the LSS was originally proposed and LEPs being charged with preparing Local Industrial Strategies, it was agreed in June 2018 that Surrey Leaders and Chief Executives should develop a growth vision and strategy for Surrey as a whole to take forward the LSS into an agreed long term spatial strategy for Surrey (and sub-county areas), setting out key strategic opportunities, including infrastructure and economic priorities: Surrey's 2050 Place Ambition. The Place Ambition is currently being refreshed with an accompanying Implementation Framework.

SPOA and PWG worked with consultant AECOM during 2015/16 to prepare an infrastructure study for the county on behalf of the Surrey local authorities as part of the evidence base for the Local Strategic Statement. This provided a 'snap-shot' in time as of July 2015, reflecting the position in terms of anticipated growth patterns to 2030 and the infrastructure needed to support such growth including transport, schools, health and social care, community facilities green infrastructure, flood defences, waste, utilities and emergency services. The Surrey Infrastructure Study (2017) reflects the updated position as of June 2017 based on revised growth projections over the period 2016/17 to 2030/31. In 2020/21 the Surrey local authorities worked with consultant ARUP to produce a Surrey Infrastructure Plan. This includes a prioritization framework to help determine 3 categories of projects depending on the stage a scheme has reached. A number of waste management projects are currently identified. The Plan will be reviewed regularly.

As part of the engagement with the Mayor on the full review of the London Plan, the Wider South East Officer Working Group considered key strategic issues including the minerals and waste issues in London and the wider southeast.

In 2020, HSPG produced a non-statutory Joint Spatial Planning Framework (JSPF) to respond to growth at Heathrow Airport. This was supported by a Joint Evidence Base and Infrastructure Study which includes waste infrastructure in the sub-region. HSPG is currently considering whether to update the evidence and review the JSPF.

Consultation protocol

Our Consultation Protocol was produced in cooperation with officers from the district and borough councils, and sets out how we will work together constructively to ensure mineral and waste management safeguarding issues are considered during the preparation of local plans and in the determination of planning applications.

Minerals and waste management safeguarding issues can arise when district and borough local plans are prepared and when planning applications are submitted.

Local Plan consultations allow a more comprehensive review of safeguarding issues where they relate to potential and proposed site allocations.

During 2020/21 Surrey County Council provided mineral and/or waste related comments to the following Surrey district and borough councils during the preparation of their local plans:

  • Guildford BC Local Plan: development management policies - Issues and Preferred Options consultation.
  • Mole Valley DC Local Plan: sites in Minerals Safeguarding Area.
  • Spelthorne BC: Spelthorne Infrastructure Delivery Plan.

In 2020/21 Surrey County Council objected to four applications on minerals and waste management safeguarding grounds.

In 2020/21 Surrey County Council commented on 29 safeguarding consultations within Surrey district and boroughs.

Surrey County Council commented on three neighbourhood plan consultations in 2020/21.

Table 1: Summary of Duty to Cooperate consultations received from other minerals/waste planning authorities in 2020/21

Authority Consultation Date Response Date Key Issue(s)
Greater Manchester, Merseyside and Halton and Warrington authorities 20 May 2020 18 June 2020 Local Aggregates Assessment
Hampshire County Council 23 September 2020 14 October 2020 Strategic minerals and waste movements
Hertfordshire County Council 19 January 2021 26 February 2021 Strategic minerals and waste movements
City of London 19 January 2021 26 February 2021 Local Plan (Regulation 18 stage)
Buckinghamshire Council 24 February 2021 19 March 2021 Duty to Cooperate: Draft Scoping Matrix
East Riding of Yorkshire Council and Hull City Council 25 February 2021 30 March 2021 Strategic minerals and waste movements

Footnotes

[Footnote 7] National Planning Policy Framework, July 2021.

Surrey Minerals Plan

Highlights

  • Sales of recycled aggregates decreased by 37.5% to 0.6 million tonnes in 2020, which remains below the Surrey Minerals Plan target of 0.9 million tonnes by 2026.
  • At the end of 2020, the total landbank of primary aggregates (land-won sand and gravel) was 8.7 years which is above the national policy requirement of at least 7 years.
  • The Surrey Minerals Plan sets out the average provision rate of 1.4 million tonnes per annum of land-won sand and gravel, which should meet future demand for primary aggregates until 2026.
  • Sales of primary aggregates increased some 7% to 0.76 million tonnes in 2020.

Due to the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic, some operators were unable to return aggregates monitoring data for the 2020 calendar year. Therefore, in some instances we have used the 2019 sales figures as an estimate. In other cases, data is available, but shows the significant disruption of multiple lockdowns on the production of aggregates.

Reducing the demands for minerals

Objective 1: reduce demand for minerals by:

  • Increasing the supply of recycled, and, where practicable, secondary aggregates;
  • Encouraging the sustainable use and recycling of minerals; and
  • Encouraging the use of substitute materials in construction.

Relevant policies to objective 1 include:

  • Policy MC4: Efficient Use of Mineral Resources;
  • Policy MC5: Recycled and Secondary Aggregates;
  • Policy AR1: Presumption in favour of sustainable development; and
  • Policy AR5: High Value Recovery

The Surrey Minerals Plan sets a target to supply at least 0.8 million tonnes per annum of recycled and secondary aggregates by 2016 and at least 0.9 million tonnes per annum by 2026.

To help achieve these targets, Surrey County Council adopted the Aggregates Recycling Joint Development Plan Document (ARJDPD) in 2013. This allocates three sites for aggregates recycling and supports proposals on certain preferred areas for mineral extraction identified in the ARJDPD. The intensification or extension of existing aggregate recycling facilities and new facilities are also supported subject to compliance with policies in both the Surrey Minerals Plan and Surrey Waste Local Plan.

To encourage sustainable construction including the use of a proportion of recycling and secondary aggregates in construction projects, the Surrey Minerals Plan requires the district and borough councils in Surrey to include relevant policies in their Local Plans. Surrey County Council liaises with the district and boroughs to secure these policies.

Surrey County Council has published standing advice on sustainable construction (PDF) to assist the Local Planning Authorities (LPAs) in determining planning applications. When appropriate, more detailed comments are provided in responses to consultations on planning applications.

Figure 1: Sales of Recycled Aggregates (thousand tonnes) in Surrey 2008 - 2020

The sales of recycled aggregates in Surrey has decreased in 2020 to 613,853 tonnes from 1,200,000 tonnes in 2019.

How did we do?

The results of the Aggregates Monitoring Survey 2020 show that sales of recycled and secondary aggregates produced in Surrey decreased by 37.5% to 0.6 million tonnes in 2020. This level of sales is below the Surrey Minerals Plan target of at least 0.9 million tonnes per annum by 2026. The decrease is down to disruption caused by the Coronavirus pandemic.

10 adopted local plans in Surrey include policies which seek to encourage the re-use and recycling of building materials in construction projects. These comprise of Elmbridge, Epsom & Ewell, Mole Valley, Reigate & Banstead, Runnymede, Spelthorne, Tandridge, Waverley and Woking. The Guildford Local Plan also includes a sustainable construction policy which was recently adopted in April 2019.

No new sites allocated in the ARJDPD received planning permission in 2020/21.

Table 2: Key Performance Indicator, targets and scores related to Objective 1

Key Performance IndicatorsTarget Performance 2020/21
Number of Adopted Local Plans in Surrey include policies on sustainable construction and seek to encourage the use of secondary and recycled aggregates. All On track
Quantity of recycled and secondary aggregates produced per annum (million tonnes per annum) 0.9 by 2026 Improvements required

Safeguarding the supply of minerals

Objective 2: safeguard the supply of minerals by:

  • Conserving important mineral resources for use by future generations;
  • Ensuring that important mineral resources and sites for mineral development are not sterilised by other development;
  • Ensuring prior extraction of mineral resources, where possible, if land is to be sterilised by other development; and
  • Conserving scarce and high quality mineral resources by ensuring that they are not used for purposes where lower grade, secondary or recycled materials could be used instead.

Relevant policies to objective 2 include:

  • DC1: Safeguarding Sites;
  • Policy MC6: Safeguarding Mineral Resources and Development; and
  • Policy MC16: Rail Aggregate Depots.

Surrey County Council defines Mineral Safeguarding Areas (MSAs) to protect resources of concreting aggregates, soft sand, silica sand, brick clay and fuller's earth from being sterilised from other development. Existing and proposed mineral sites including rail aggregate depots and aggregate recycling facilities are also safeguarded.

The Surrey Minerals Plan requires the 11 district and boroughs in Surrey to consult the Minerals and Waste Planning Authority (MWPA) about applications for development which could sterilise mineral resources within MSAs or prejudice existing or proposed sites.

How did we do?

Surrey County Council's website provides an online map viewer which displays all the MSAs and existing minerals sites across the county.

In conjunction with the 11 district and boroughs, Surrey County Council has produced a revised consultation protocol which was published in October 2016 and is now in use.

In 2020/221, no planning permissions were granted for alternative development in areas safeguarded for mineral supply and where objection was raised by Surrey County Council.

Table 3: Key Performance Indicators, targets and scores related to Objective 2

Key Performance IndicatorsTarget Performance 2020/21
Number of new planning permissions granted for alternative development in areas safeguarded for mineral supply and when where objection was raised by Surrey County Council. 0 Target met
Number of Local Planning Authorities in Surrey that have up to date information about safeguarding areas. All Target met
Number of Local Planning Authorities in Surrey that have adopted the Minerals and Waste Consultation protocol. All Target met

Meet the need for minerals

Objective 3: meet the need for minerals by:

  • Seeking to ensure that sufficient land is identified to enable the regional requirement for aggregates to be met and to provide appropriate landbanks for silica sand and clay;
  • Establishing criteria that define the circumstances and locations where working of other non-aggregate minerals will be acceptable; and
  • Seeking to ensure that sufficient land is identified for recycling facilities to meet the need for aggregates recycling.

Relevant policies to objective 3 include:

  • Policy MC7: Aggregate Minerals Supply;
  • Policy MC8: Silica Sand Supply;
  • Policy MC9: Brick Clay Supply;
  • Policy MC10: Other Non-Aggregate Minerals Supply;
  • Policy MC11: Mineral Extraction Outside Preferred Areas;
  • Policy MC12: Oil and Gas Development;
  • Policy MC13: Underground Gas Storage;
  • Policy MC16: Rail Aggregate Depots;
  • Policy MA1: Aggregates Supply;
  • Policy MA2: Preferred Areas for Concreting Aggregates;
  • Policy MA3: Preferred Areas for Soft Sand;
  • Policy AR2: Aggregate Recycling Facilities;
  • Policy AR3: Aggregates Recycling at Mineral Sites; and
  • Policy AR4: Aggregates Recycling Outside Preferred Areas.

Local Aggregate Assessment

The National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) 2021 requires the MWPA to prepare an annual Local Aggregate Assessment (LAA). An LAA is an assessment of future land-won sand and gravel supply and should be based on a rolling average of 10 years' sales data and other relevant local information. LAAs are required to include an assessment of all aggregate supply options.

Surrey's most recent Local Aggregate Assessment was published in July 2021.

The assessment of future mineral supply requirements concluded that the Surrey Minerals Plan provision rate is still appropriate.

Landbank for sand and gravel

The 2021 Aggregates Monitoring Survey calculated that the county's total landbank for primary aggregates fell slightly from 8.8 years at the end of 2019 to 8.7 years at the end of 2020. The primary reason for the decrease was due to no new significant planning permissions being granted during 2019 to replenish reserves that were extracted. The size of the landbank accords with the National Planning Policy Framework advice which requires a landbank of 7 years for sand and gravel.

In 2020/21, there were no new planning permission granted for primary extractions.

Landbank for silica sand

The landbank for silica sand is calculated as a range and is between 5 and 10 years which is below the target of more than 10 years contained in national policy advice. The actual landbank figure is not provided for reasons of commercial confidentiality.

No planning permissions for new sites for the extraction of silica sand were granted during 2020/21.

Supply of brick clay

There are two brick clay production sites within the county, these are located in Mole Valley (Ewhurst Brickworks) and Beare Green (South Holmwood Brickworks).

No new planning permissions for brick clay extraction were determined in 2020/21. However, the evidence base prepared in support of the preparation of the Surrey Minerals Plan indicated that permitted clay reserves at the individual sites were sufficient to satisfy the landbank requirement of 25 years required by the national policy guidance.

Other non-aggregate minerals supply

No planning applications were received or determined during 2020/21 for other non-aggregate minerals.

Oil and gas development

No planning permissions were issued during 2020/21 for oil and gas development.

Underground gas storage

No planning applications were received or determined during 2020/21 for underground gas storage.

How did we do?

The total landbank for primary aggregates (sand and gravel) was 8.7 years at the end of 2020. However, this figure masks a significant imbalance between the separate landbanks for concreting aggregates, and soft sand, which were 3.8 years and 14.9 years respectively.

Table 4: Key Performance Indicators, targets and scores related to Objective 3

Key Performance IndicatorsTarget Performance 2020/21
Landbank of permitted reserves for total primary aggregates Greater than 7 years' supply Target met
Landbank of permitted reserves for concreting aggregates Greater than 7 years' supply Improvements required
Landbank of permitted reserves for soft sand Greater than 7 years' supply Target met
Landbank of permitted reserves for silica sand Greater than 10 years' supply On track
Landbank of permitted reserves supporting brick clay production 25 year landbank at active sites Target met
Number of new planning permissions granted for oil and gas production 0 Target met

Protecting communities and the environment

Objective 4: Address adverse impacts from mineral development on communities and the environment by:

  • Identifying preferred areas for mineral development;
  • Establishing planning policies that will ensure potential impacts on local communities and the environment are identified and suitably mitigate by applying the appropriate conditions to planning permissions;
  • Protecting the integrity of internationally designated sites and features designated as having national importance; and
  • Working with communities to ensure local issues are understood and addressed.

Relevant policies to objective 4 include:

  • Policy MC1: Spatial Strategy – Location of Mineral Development in Surrey;
  • Policy MC2: Spatial Strategy – Protection of Key Environmental Interests in Surrey;
  • Policy MC3: Mineral Development in the Green Belt; and
  • Policy MC14: Reducing the adverse impacts of mineral development.

The preferred areas and areas of search identified in the Surrey Minerals Plan identify locations where it is considered that mineral workings is possible without significant adverse impacts on the environment or the local community. There is a presumption against the working of sand and gravel and silica sand from land outside these areas to provide greater certainty for local communities and the minerals industry.

Policy MC2 states that mineral development will not be permitted where it would be likely to have an adverse impact on the integrity of sites covered by national and international designations.

Policy MC3 only allows mineral development in the Green Belt where the highest environmental standards of operation are maintained, and the land is restored to an agreed after-use consistent with Green Belt objectives within agreed time limits.

Policy MC14 only allows mineral development where there would be no significant adverse impact in relation to a number of matters including noise, dust, fumes, traffic, flood risk, landscape character, biodiversity, historic landscape, open space and the risk of birds striking aircraft.

How did we do?

In 2020/2021,16 full decisions were issued for minerals related development and 19 detail pursuant applications were determined. All decisions were related to existing permitted sites.

No new permissions were granted for primary aggregates extraction in 2020/21.

Table 5: Key Performance Indicators, targets and scores related to Objective 4

Key Performance IndicatorsTarget Performance 2020/21
Number of new planning permissions for minerals development outside preferred areas and areas of search. 0 Target met
Number of new planning permissions for minerals development within areas covered by landscape of ecological designations, 0 Target met

Addressing the adverse impacts of transportation

Objective 5: Address adverse impacts from the transportation of minerals by:

  • Ensuring the potential impacts from transportation are considered when identifying areas for future mineral development;
  • Establishing planning policies that will ensure that the impacts from transportation of minerals are assessed and suitable mitigation provided, where necessary;
  • Securing measures to ensure that minerals can be transported safely;
  • Encouraging the use of alternative modes of transportation to road where possible; and
  • Safeguarding existing rail depots and enabling new ones to be provided if need is demonstrated, to facilitate a long-term shift away from the bulk transportation of minerals by road.

Relevant policies to objective 5 include:

  • Policy MC14: Reducing the Adverse Impacts of Minerals Development;
  • Policy MC15: Transport for Minerals; and
  • Policy MC16: Rail Aggregate Depots.

Surrey Minerals Plan policies MC14 and MC15 require the potential impacts of mineral transportation to be considered in the determination of planning applications and mitigation to be provided where necessary. Policy MC15 also ensures that mineral development involving transport by road will be permitted only where there is no practicable alternative to the use of road-based transport that would have a lower impact on communities and the environment.

The nature of the market for minerals in Surrey means that Heavy Good Vehicles (HGVs) are used for transportation in almost all cases as this is the most efficient means of transport. As aggregate minerals worked in Surrey tend to be used near to where they are extracted, there is limited scope to transport minerals by rail because this usually requires large volumes to be moved over longer distances to work in practical and commercial terms. Transportation by water is also problematic because of constraints associated with lock capacity, vessel size and wharf locations.

Opportunities to transport minerals to a mineral processing plant by conveyor are investigated where appropriate, as well as opportunities to transport minerals such as onshore oil and gas by pipeline.

The County Highway Authority (CHA) is consulted on all relevant applications for minerals development and their comments are taken into account in determining the same. Where necessary, the applicant is required to provide measures to address any significant adverse impacts. These are frequently addressed through the imposition of planning conditions limiting the number of HGV movements that are permitted and/or requiring other mitigation measures.

How did we do?

In 2020/21, 16 full decisions were issued for minerals development and 19 details pursuant application were determined. All decisions were related to existing permitted sites. No permission relating to alternative methods of transport (other than by road) were issued.

Surrey has two rail aggregate depots at Woking (active) and Salfords (currently inactive), both of which are safeguarded by the Surrey Minerals Plan Core Strategy Development Plan Document. Between the two depots they present a good geographic spread between the west and east of the county. Rail connections enable the supply of crushed rock from the West Country and marine sand and gravel from Wharves of the Thames Estuary.

Table 6: Key Performance Indicators, targets and scores related to Objective 5

Key Performance IndicatorsTarget Performance 2020/21
Number of new planning permissions that provide alternative methods of transporting minerals other than by road. 0 Improvements required

Restoration and enhancement

Objective 6: Restore mineral workings to the highest standards by:

  • Promoting an holistic approach to mineral working, where progressive restoration is integrated into the management and phasing of the mineral extraction;
  • Ensuring that mineral workings are restored in a timely way, consistent with green belt policy and objectives, and to a state that is consistent with - and enhance - local, social and environmental character, incorporating priority habitats and flood alleviation capacity, where appropriate, and;
  • Ensuring that land used for mineral working is restored to an appropriate future use and managed so that it brings value to the environment and local community.

Relevant policies to objective 6 include:

  • Policy MC17: Restoring Mineral Workings; and
  • Policy MC18: Restoration and Enhancement.

The 'Surrey Style' of restoration is recognised as best practice by the Local Government Association and the Planning Officers Society and is advocated by the Nature after Minerals (NAM) initiative led by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) and Natural England.

The Surrey Mineral Planning Site Restoration Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) promotes a restoration led approach to the consideration of applications for mineral working.

This approach enables site restoration and enhancements to deliver substantial environmental and community benefits including biodiversity, landscape, and recreational opportunities.

How did we do?

During the 2020/2021 monitoring period, progress on restoration schemes included:

  • Progressive restoration continued with new sites or phases being signed into aftercare including the Old Hogs Back area of Runfold South and Albury Sandpit/Landfill site.
  • Advancement of restoration works in other sites such as North Park Quarry, Stanwell Quarry, Hithermoor, Queen Mary's Quarry, further phases at Runfold South, as well as an enhancement project at Glebe Lake at Mercer's South Quarry.
  • Promotion and support of a partnership approach such as through management groups overseeing the restoration and aftercare of Runfold South, Queen Mary's Quarry and Farnham Quarry, and input into Community Liaison Groups for North Park Quarry and Patteson Court.
  • Monitoring of restored sites or phases in aftercare and under long term management to ensure their effective management and maintenance. These sites include: Park Lake, Coldharbour Lane, Runfold North and South, Reigate Road, Home Farm and Field Common North. Additional monitoring of operational sites to promote progressive restoration and the maintenance and aftercare of any advanced landscape planting.
  • Involvement with Surrey Nature Partnership to ensure a joined-up approach between restoration strategies and other nature conservation strategies taking place across the county. Assisting with the organisation and successful running of the second Surrey Biodiversity and Planning Conference, despite the Coronavirus pandemic.
  • Ongoing input into Surrey County Council's Tree Planting Strategy to ensure any sites suitable for additional tree planting are identified and included.
  • Continued involvement with the joint Surrey County Council and Environment Agency River Thames flood alleviation scheme (RTS).
  • Further contribution to the national steering group tasked with updating DEFRA's Good Practice Guide for Handling Soils.
  • Ongoing involvement with the EU funded Urban Links to Landscape (UL2L) project and rolling out the implementation of a previous EU funded RESTORE project.
  • Continued involvement in national steering group for Nature After Minerals (NAM).
  • Continuing to raise concerns over the lack of inert waste materials available to restore mineral sites. This works against the policy prerogative of restoration at the earliest possible date and will lead to extension of time applications. Delays with the Environment Agency permitting process is further compounding the problem.

In 2020/2021, two planning applications were issued in relation to the restoration of mineral sites, these are summarised in Table 8.

Table 7 Key Performance Indicators, targets and scores related to Objective 6

Key Performance IndicatorsTarget Performance 2020/21
Number of new planning permissions for mineral restoration and enhancement schemes. 0 Target met

Table 8 Summary of permissions issues in 2020/21 related to restoration of mineral workings

Reference Site NameDescription
MO/2020/0702 Park Pit, Reigate Road, Buckland, Surrey, RH3 7BE Details of a Landscape and Ecology Management Plan pursuant to Condition 11 of planning permission ref: MO/2017/1797 dated 30 May 2018.
GU20/CON/00012 Albury Sandpit/Landfill Site, Shere Road, Albury, Guildford, GU5 8BW

Non-material amendment to planning permission GU10/1877 dated 25 July 2011 to amend the approved Restoration Masterplan, including provision of a fenced route to a permissive viewpoint and retention of the existing access track and leachate pump generator, and adding a condition requiring the removal of redundant infrastructure associated with the gas and leachate control systems.

Surrey Waste Local Plan

Highlights

  • During 2020, Surrey produced an estimated total of 3.59 million tonnes of waste, including: 0.56 million tonnes of Local Authority Collected Waste, 0.55 million tonnes of Commercial and Industrial Waste, 2.45 million tonnes of Construction Demolition and Excavation (C,D&E) Waste, and 0.03 million tonnes of Hazardous Waste.
  • During 2020, Surrey's Community Recycling Centres (CRCs) achieved a reuse and recycling rate of 51% and a landfill diversion rate of 88% (Waste Data Flow (WDF) 2020).
  • Six planning consents were granted for waste related development in Surrey in 2020/21.

Towards net self-sufficiency

Strategic objective 1: To make sure enough waste management capacity of the right type is provided to manage the equivalent amount of waste produced in Surrey.

Relevant policies include:

  • Policy 1: Need for waste development

Surrey County Council is committed to achieving net self-sufficiency, which means the ability of Surrey County Council to provide sufficient capacity to manage the equivalent amount of waste produced within the county. This means that the amount of waste being produced and the capacity that is available in Surrey needs to be monitored to assess whether the policies in place are supporting this.

Current capacity

Surrey is technically net self-sufficient, however a large proportion of Local Authority Collected Waste (LACW) and Commercial and Industrial (C&I) waste is exported for treatment due to a lack of facilities within the county. The reliance on capacity outside of Surrey is of concern for the Waste Planning Authority (WPA) when considering Surrey County Council's requirement to be net self‑sufficient.

Information regarding a sites capacity is often provided alongside any planning application and supporting documents, however, this is likely to reflect a theoretical maximum capacity and, the actual throughput can be much lower.

The amount of waste being managed at each facility, i.e., its throughput, is dependent on a number of factors related to both the facility itself and external factors. These include:

  • Technology in use at the site;
  • Site layout;
  • Number of permitted Heavy Good Vehicles (HGVs);
  • Waste stream and available feedstock;
  • Weather.

The best information about capacity can be obtained from direct contact with waste operators as changes to site layout, access, and improvements to equipment and infrastructure can all provide for an improvement to the throughput of a waste management facility. These changes may not always be directly attributable to the relevant waste management facility or require a new planning permission.

The annual throughput of waste management facilities is also estimated from the information collected by the Environment Agency (EA) through its Waste Data Interrogator (WDI). Information can also be obtained from planning permissions and related documents.

Current estimates for available capacity in Surrey, based on the Waste Needs Assessment (January 2019) undertaken to support the preparation of the Surrey Waste Local Plan, are set out in Table 9 to Table 12 below.

Table 9: Available waste management capacity in Surrey (tonnes per annum) for recycling and other recovery (excluding aggregate recycling and recovery to land)

Treatment Type Capacity 2017 Capacity 2018 Capacity 2019
Anaerobic Digestion110,00094,00070,000
Composting (subtotal)66,00065,00063,000
Composting 59,000 58,000 56,000
Green Waste 7,000 7,000 7,000
Other Recovery 221,000 365,000 323,000
Recycling (subtotal)488,000498,000421,000
Community Recycling Centre 176,000 168,000 151,000
Materials Recovery Facility 291,000 307,000 244,000
Metal Recycling Sites (including ELV) 21,000 23,000 26,000
Transfer (subtotal)677,000695,000673,000
CRC Waste Transfer Station 532,000 541,000 544,000
Waste Transfer Station 145,000 154,000 129,000
Total1,562,0001,717,0001,550,000

Table 10: Available waste management capacity in Surrey (tonnes) for deposit of non-inert waste to land

Treatment Type Capacity 2017 Capacity 2018 Capacity 2019
Disposal of non-inert waste to land 6,740,000 6,060,000 5,567,000

Table 11: Available waste management capacity in Surrey (tonnes per annum) for C,D&E Recycling (source: WNA 2019)

Treatment Type Capacity 2017 Capacity 2018 Capacity 2019
C,D&E Recycling (subtotal) 1,190,000 1,704,000 1,620,000
C,D&E Recycling 1,034,000 1,548,000 1,495,000
Soil Recycling Facility 156,000 156,000 125,000

Table 12: Available waste management capacity in Surrey (tonnes) for recovery of inert waste to land

Treatment Type Capacity 2017 Capacity 2018 Capacity 2019
Recovery of Inert Waste to Land 12,896,000 15,416,000 14,656,000

New capacity

There was one planning permission granted in 2020/21 that provided increased waste management capacity in relation to an existing facility, namely:

  • Unit 11 and 12 Wintersells Road, Byfleet Road, Elmbridge (Planning Ref: EL18/3802)

How did we do?

Generally, there is sufficient capacity overall to deal with the equivalent amount of waste arising in Surrey, however, a significant proportion of this capacity is landfill. While landfill is recognised as an alternative the Minerals and Waste Planning Authority (MWPA) should plan for, it is considered the least desirable method of managing our waste. Therefore, Surrey needs to continue to promote facilities for preparing for reuse, recycling, and recovery of waste. Tables 13 to 16 shows that capacity gap in Surrey for 2017-2019.

Table 13: Waste management capacity gap in Surrey (tonnes per annum) for recycling and other recovery in 2017-2019 (excluding aggregate recycling and recovery to land)

Treatment Type201720182019
Recycling [footnote 8] 540,000 581,000 441,000
Anaerobic Digestion 45,000 31,000 7,000
Other Recovery -10,000 139,000 160,000

Table 14: Waste management capacity gap in Surrey (tonnes) for deposit of non-inert waste to land in 2017-2019 (including landfill)

Treatment Type201720182019
Disposal to Land [footnote 9] 6,740,000 6,060,000 5,567,000

Table 15: Waste management capacity gap in Surrey (tonnes per annum) for C,D&E Recycling in 2017-2019 (including soil recycling)

Treatment Type201720182019
C,D&E Waste Recycling 311,000 289,000 85,000

Table 16: Waste management capacity gap in Surrey (tonnes) for recovery of inert waste to land in 2017-2019 (including landfill)

Treatment Type201720182019
Recovery to Land [footnote 10] 12,896,000

15,416,000

14,656,000

Table 17: Key Performance Indicators, targets and scores related to net self-sufficiency

Strategic ObjectivePolicy Key Performance IndicatorTarget(s) Performance 2020/21
1 Policy 1 Waste management capacity compared with waste generated. Capacity is at least equal to the waste generated (net self-sufficiency). On track

Sustainable management of waste

Strategic Objective 2: To encourage development which supports sustainable waste management at least in line with national targets for recycling, recovery and composting.

Strategic Objective 3: To manage waste by disposal to land as an option of last resort.

Relevant policies include:

  • Policy 2: Recycling and recovery
  • Policy 3: Recycling of inert C,D&E waste
  • Policy 4: Sustainable construction and waste management in new development
  • Policy 5: Recovery of inert waste to land
  • Policy 6: Disposal of non-inert waste to land
  • Joint Municipal Waste Management Strategy (JMWMS)
  • Waste Disposal Authority Action Plan

The Waste Framework Directive (WFD) is the overarching European legislation with regards to waste. The WFD includes the requirement for plans to promote sustainable management of waste through the waste hierarchy. The waste hierarchy promotes the prevention of waste and, where this is not possible, recommends waste materials should be reused, recycled or recovered. Landfill and incineration without energy recovery are the least preferred options for waste management and sit at the bottom of the hierarchy. The WFD has been transcribed into UK law via the Waste Regulations 2011 (as amended).

The European Union agreed the Circular Economy Package (CEP) on 22 May 2018, which sets out amendments to the WFD as well as the Landfill Directive and the Packaging Waste Directive. Key features of the package include requirements for member states to achieve:

  • Municipal waste recycling rates of 55% by 2025, 60% by 2030 and 65% by 2035.
  • Packaging materials recycling rates of 65% by 2025 and 70% by 2030.
  • A maximum of 35% municipal waste to landfill by 2035.
  • Separate collection of textiles and hazardous waste from households by 2025.

The UK government has said that it will adopt the CEP measures, which were formally adopted by the EU in May 2018.

The UK government released a Resource and Waste Strategy in December 2018, which sets out how the UK will preserve our stock of material resources by minimising waste, promoting resource efficiency and moving towards a circular economy. The strategy set out five strategic ambitions:

  1. To work towards all plastic packaging placed on the market being recyclable, reusable or compostable by 2025;
  2. To work towards eliminating food waste to landfill by 2030;
  3. To eliminate avoidable plastic waste over the lifetime of the 25 Year Environment Plan;
  4. To double resource productivity by 2050; and
  5. To eliminate avoidable waste of all kinds by 2050.

The Surrey Waste Partnership, made up of the 11 district and borough councils as the Waste Collection Authorities (WCAs), and Surrey County Council as the Waste Disposal Authority (WDA), maintain the Joint Municipal Waste Management Strategy (JMWMS). The JMWMS sets out how the Surrey Waste Partnership will manage Local Authority Collected Waste (LACW) in the most efficient, effective, economical and sustainable manner.

A revised Joint Municipal Waste Management Strategy (Revision 2) was formally adopted by all Surrey authorities in November 2015. The revised strategy sets out a number of strategic targets; total household waste per person, recycling and recovery rate, percentage municipal waste sent to landfill, and cost of waste management per household. The JMWMS also outlines a number of actions to be undertaken to deliver the Surrey Waste Partnership's objectives. The JMWMS is focused on achieving sustainable management of LACW through positive partnership working.

Surrey Waste Partnership reviews the suitability of the joint strategy's actions each year and made minor updates in 2016, 2017 and 2018. The partnership reviews the strategic targets of the strategy every two years, and the latest review in spring 2017 found that the existing targets were still fit for purpose. Aside from the annual action updates, the strategies are now due to be reviewed again. Progress against the actions of the joint strategy is reviewed annually at partnership meetings, and progress against the targets is reviewed every quarter.

Local Authority Collected Waste (LACW)

LACW data is calculated from data reported by local authorities to WasteDataFlow (WDF), a UK web-based system for LACW data reporting by local authorities to Government.

Table 17 shows the LACW arisings in Surrey in 2020/21 were 556,458 tonnes, slightly more than the 526,642 tonnes in 2019/20. The total amount of LACW reused, recycled or composted was 300,348 tonnes. Of the remaining 256,110 tonnes of residual waste, 235,076 tonnes were sent for energy recovery and 21,034 tonnes were sent to landfill.

Table 17: Management of Local Authority Collected Municipal Waste in Surrey for 2020 (WasteDataFlow 2020)

Local Authority Collected WasteTonnes%
Reused, Recycled or composted 300,348 54%
Energy Recovery 235,076 42%
Transfer, other treatment or unallocated 0 0%
Landfilled 21,034 4%
Total 556,458 100%

The revised JMWMS (2015) recognises that traditional targets for recycling and amount of household waste arisings are not flexible and do not take account of external factors such as the state of the economy and extreme weather.

A combined recycling recovery rate target is aimed at increasing flexibility in reporting for instances where recovery is preferable to recycling, for example recovering energy from wood waste that is not clean enough for recycling. The methodology for calculating the recycling recovery rate includes the tonnage of household waste sent for reuse, recycling, or composting, and separately collected materials where recovery is preferable to recycling such as street sweepings and non-clean wood.

The revised JMWMS (2015) sets revised targets to be achieved by 2019/20 for the management of municipal waste using 2013 to 2014 as a baseline. These targets include:

  • Total household waste and recycling per person – target performing in the top quartile of WDAs;
  • Recycling and recovery rate [footnote 11] - target 70%;
  • Municipal waste sent to landfill - target 0%.

In 2020/21 the Community Recycling Centres (CRCs) in Surrey received 72,597 tonnes of waste, 51% of which was reused or recycled, 37% of which was sent for energy recovery and 12% of which was sent to landfill. A breakdown of the quantities of materials received is given in Appendix 3.

The total percentage of household waste sent for re-use, recycling or composting in each district in 2020/21 is given in Table 18. The recycling rates are calculated from data reported by local authorities to WasteDataFlow.

Table 18: Reuse, Recycling and Composting rates (%) for Household Waste for District and Boroughs in Surrey 2020 (WasteDataFlow 2020)

 2013 to 20142014 to 20152015 to 20162016 to 20172017 to 20182018 to 20192019 to 20202020 to 2021
Elmbridge 49.15% 50.92% 52.90% 55% 53.7% 51.4% 51.8% 54.5%
Epsom and Ewell 46% 46.80% 45.40% 46.80% 49.4% 53.2% 55.1% 53.7%
Guildford 52.23% 56.76% 58.20% 59.70% 59.3% 57% 59.3% 58.9%
Mole Valley 52.77% 55.60% 59% 58.20% 59.3% 52.9% 53.9% 56.6%
Reigate and Banstead 52.04% 52.57% 48.80% 55% 54.3% 53.5% 54.4% 53.2%
Runnymede 41.84% 43.74% 44.50% 44.10% 44.6% 41.6% 42.8% 49.0%
Spelthorne 41.19% 43.16% 45.60% 46% 46.4% 44.5% 45.3% 46.4%
Surrey Heath 58.12% 63.30% 62.10% 62.30% 62.20% 61.4% 63.5% 61.3%
Tandridge 51% 51.67% 53.10% 57.70% 58.3% 58.1% 58.6% 59.9%
Waverley 45.20% 51.69% 54.80% 51.30% 53.5% 55.6% 53.6% 57%
Woking 55.36% 58.43% 58.70% 59.40% 58% 56.8% 56.9% 54.3%

The recycling rates for LACW in the Surrey districts and boroughs continues to be high. Furthermore, there is evidence to support a decrease in residual waste arisings per household which increased from 448 kg per head in 2019 to 482 kg per head in 2020 (WDF 2020). However, there is an ongoing need to continue to focus on reducing LACW in line with waste prevention which sits at the top of the waste hierarchy.

Figure 2: Local Authority Collected Waste arising and fate (percentage) between 2007 to 2020 (WasteDataFlow)

In 2020 54% of LACW arisings was recycled whilst waste being sent to landfill and energy recovery facilities decreased.

The amount of waste being sent for recovery was 177,702 tonnes in 2020/21. The recovered material was mainly sent to Energy from Waste (EfW) facilities and facilities for processing of Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) outside of the county at:

  • Allington Quarry, Laverstoke Road, Maidstone, Kent (32%)
  • Lakeside Energy from Waste Facility, Lakeside Road, Colnbrook, Berkshire (3%)
  • Stobart Biomass Tilbury (8%)
  • Facility outside the UK but within Europe (57%)

Commercial and industrial (C&I) waste

There is currently no formal requirement for all businesses to report material flows or waste arisings. Existing data sources that incorporate elements of this information, such as waste transfer notes, and waste permit returns, allow for an insufficient depth of analysis to estimate C&I waste arisings.

The most current survey data for Commercial and Industrial (C&I) waste arisings in Surrey is based on data from a national survey published in December 2010 [footnote 12]. The report was commissioned by Defra and produced by Jacobs, with support from Halcrow. The survey reported that 6,250,000 tonnes of C&I waste was generated in the South-East region. It was estimated that total C&I arisings in Surrey were 548,000 tonnes.

An updated calculation for C&I waste was undertaken using a modified version of the national methodology for Commercial & Industrial Waste (2014) [footnote 13] to support the preparation of a new Surrey Waste Local Plan. The amount of C&I waste arising in Surrey was calculated using the following equation:

C&I waste = (Inputs to permitted facilities + inputs to energy from waste + exemptions + exports) - (household waste + C,D&E waste + mining, agricultural and wastewater waste + imports)

The result of this work was a revised estimate that 547,975 tonnes of C&I waste was generated in Surrey in 2020.

In order to be able to report on changes in C&I year on year, the EA's WDI has been used as a source for C&I waste information before 2015.

The WDI provides an indication of the volume of waste managed through permitted facilities. It does not include those facilities which process waste under exemptions.

Figure 3: Estimated C&I waste arising (tonnes per annum) in Surrey for the period 2009 - 2020 (WDI 2020)

The estimated C&I waste arisings in Surrey has decreased from 644,864 in 2019 to 644,864 in 2020.

Construction, demolition and excavation (C,D&E) Waste

Construction waste is defined as "waste materials, which arise from the construction or demolition of buildings and/or civil engineering infrastructure, including hard construction and demolition waste and excavation waste, whether segregated or mixed" [footnote 14].

The methodology applied to calculate CD&E waste was modified from the Defra Methodology for Calculating CD&E waste for Waste Statistics and Waste Framework Directive reporting purposes [footnote 15]. The amount of CD&E waste arising in Surrey was calculated using the following equation:

CD&E waste = Inputs to permitted facilities + outputs from permitted facilities + recycled aggregates + exemptions

The result was that an estimated 2,449,073 tonnes of CD&E waste arose in Surrey in 2020.

The EA's WDI provides a summary of types and quantities of waste that were handled by waste facilities regulated by the EA. These returns are only for those facilities which are regulated under a permitting regime and so are not the complete picture. However, they are useful in identifying general trends in CD&E waste arisings.

Figure 4: Amount of CD&E waste (tonnes per annum) in Surrey for the period 2009- 2020 (WDI 2020)

The estimated CD&E waste arisings in Surrey has decreased from 2,647,268 in 2019 to 2,449,073 in 2020.

Other waste streams

Based on information in the Environment Agency's Hazardous Waste Interrogator, the amount of hazardous waste arisings in Surrey during 2020 was 33,602 tonnes.

Figure 5: Amount of hazardous waste arising (tonnes per annum) in Surrey for the period 2009-2020 (HWDI 2020)

The hazardous waste arisings in Surrey for 2020 was 33,602 tonnes.

How did we do?

A summary of the waste arisings for each of the main waste streams (LACW, C&I and CD&E) are shown in Table 19 below. All three waste arisings fell slightly from 2019 to 2020.

Surrey County Council is moving towards its target for sending zero LACW to landfill; in 2020/21 the amount of LACW waste to landfill was 4% (WDF 2020). Similarly, the council is progressing well towards achieving its target for recycling at CRCs with 54% of LACW waste being reused, recycled or composted (WDF 2020).

Table 19: Summary of Waste Arisings for main waste streams in Surrey for 2019 and 2020 [footnote 16]

 20192020
Local Authority Collected Waste 526,642 556,458
Commercial and Industrial waste 644,864 548,000
Construction, Demolition and Excavation waste 2,647,268 2,449,073

Table 20: Key Performance Indicator, targets and scores related to Sustainable Management of Waste

Strategic ObjectivePolicy Key Performance IndicatorTarget(s) Performance 2020/21
2 Policy 2

% of waste from households re-used or recycled.

% of C&I waste re-used or recycled.

70% of waste from households re-used or recycled by 2033.

70% of C&I waste is re-used or recycled by 2033.

Improvements required
2 Policy 3

% of CD&E waste recycled.

80% of CD&E waste is recycled by 2033. Improvements required
2 Policy 4

Number of planning applications accompanied by information setting out how waste will be managed.

Last update of Consultation Protocol.

100% of planning applications are accompanied by information setting out how waste will be managed.

Consultation Protocol has been updated in the last 12 months.
Target met
2 Policy 5 % of CD&E waste sent for disposal to landfill. 5% of CD&E waste sent for disposal to landfill by 2025.

0% of CD&E waste sent for disposal to landfill by 2033.
On track
3 Policy 6 % of waste from households sent for disposal to landfill.

% of C&I waste sent for disposal to landfill.
<5% of waste from households sent for disposal to landfill by 2025.

<1% of waste from households sent for disposal to landfill by 2035.

<10% of C&I waste sent for disposal to landfill by 2025.

<5% of C&I waste sent for disposal to landfill by 2035.
On track

Location of waste facilities

Strategic Objective 4: To retain and make best use of existing sites for waste development.

Strategic Objective 5: To direct new facilities to locations that are most suitable for waste development.

Relevant policies include:

  • Policy 7: Safeguarding.
  • Policy 8: Improvement or extension of existing facilities.
  • Policy 9: Green Belt.
  • Policy 10: Areas suitable for the development of waste management facilities.
  • Policies 11a and 11b: Strategic waste site allocations and Allocations of a Site for a Household Waste Materials Recycling Facility.
  • Policy 12: Waste Water Treatment Works.

No sites allocated in the Surrey Waste Local Plan (SWLP) 2020 received planning permission for a new waste use in 2020/21. In addition to this, no sites allocated in the SWLP 2020 received planning permissions relating to existing waste uses in 2020/21.

Of the 10 full planning permissions for waste management development granted in 2020/21, eight were located on land designated as Metropolitan Green Belt.

No sites allocated in the SWLP for waste management development were lost to alternative uses following an objection from the county council on grounds of safeguarding in 2020/21.

How did we do?

Policy 10 provides key principles of areas suitable for development of waste management facilities. The policy sets out that it is preferred for development of additional waste management capacity on suitable sites outside the Green Belt.

All applications for sites within the Green Belt were assessed against the relevant policies in the SWLP and it was determined that reasonable exceptions to Green Belt policy could be made so as to allow for the grant of planning permission in those particular circumstances.

Table 21: Key Performance Indicators, targets and score related towards net self-sufficiency

Strategic ObjectivePolicy Key Performance IndicatorTarget(s) Performance 2020/21
4 Policy 7 Number of suitable waste sites or planned facilities lost contrary to advice from SCC as the Waste Planning Authority. No existing suitable waste sites or planned facilities lost contrary to advice from Surrey County Council as the WPA. Target met
4 Policy 8 Losses and additions of waste management capacity. There are no planning permissions granted for new waste management facilities in the Green Belt where these are not justified by VSC. Target met
5 Policy 9 Number of planning permissions granted for new waste management facilities in the Green Belt where these are not justified by VSC. There are no planning permissions granted for new waste management facilities in the Green Belt where these are not justified by VSC. Target met
5 Policy 10, 11a+b Number of new developments located in unsuitable locations. 100% of new development is developed in suitable locations. Target met
5 Policy 12 Sufficient capacity for wastewater treatment as identified by the sewerage undertaker. Sufficient capacity for wastewater treatment as identified by the sewerage undertaker. Target met

Protecting communities and the environment

Strategic Objective 6: To encourage innovation and best practice which provide opportunities to minimise the impact of waste development on communities and the environment.

Strategic Objective 7: To keep waste movement by road to minimum practicable levels and support options for sustainable transport.

Strategic Objective 8: To work closely with our partners.

Relevant policies include:

  • Policy 13: Sustainable design.
  • Policy 14: Protecting communities and environments.
  • Policy 15: Transport and connectivity.
  • Policy 16: Community engagement.

Policy 14 seeks to ensure that any new permission granted for waste management facilities would not result in significant adverse effects on people, land, infrastructure and resources. In 2020/21, no consents for waste management development were granted in an area covered by a landscape designation.

No new limits were imposed on highways movements, but it is noted that all decisions were related to sites in existing waste use, some of which have existing limits on movements of Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs).

By assessing these applications against the policies Surrey County Council continues to demonstrate its commitment to protecting its communities and environment. By ensuring appropriate conditions are included, Surrey County Council seeks to negotiate the best possible outcomes from development where this impacts in areas designated for their special environmental, landscape or historical features.

How did we do?

Surrey County Council achieved its target of no new permissions for waste management development in areas covered by international and national designations [footnote 17]. There was one details pursuant permission granted for an existing site in the Surrey Hills AONB and AGLV. There were also three permissions granted with close proximity to a Site of Nature Conservation Importance (SNCI), however appropriate conditions should mitigate against any unacceptable impacts.

Table 22: Key Performance Indicators, targets and scored related to Protecting communities and the environment

Strategic ObjectivePolicy Key Performance IndicatorTarget(s) Performance 2020/21
6 Policy 13 Number of planning applications permitted where design of new or enhanced waste management facilities is contrary to Policy 13. No planning applications permitted where design of new or enhanced waste management facilities is contrary to Policy 13. Target met
6 Policy 14

Number of applications refused during the monitoring year, where the reasons for refusal include unacceptable impacts on one or more of the categories of sensitive environmental assets, environmental receptors, or community receptors referred to in Part A and B of Policy 14.

% of applications that include conditions to manage identified impacts on the categories of sensitive environmental assets, environmental receptors or community receptors referred to in Part A and Part B of Policy 14. of Policy 14.

No applications refused during the monitoring year, where the reasons for refusal include unacceptable impacts on one or more of the categories of sensitive environmental assets, environmental receptors, or community receptors referred to in Part A and B.

100% applications granted permission include conditions to manage identified impacts on the categories of sensitive environmental assets, environmental receptors or community receptors referred to in Part A and Part B of Policy 14.

Target met
7 Policy 15 % of proposals that include assessment of ability to transport waste via sustainable modes. Main waste sources well connected to facilities.

100% of proposals include assessment of ability to transport waste via sustainable modes.
Target met
8 Policy 16 % of relevant applications supported by a Statement of Community Involvement produced by the applicant.

% of attendance at joint working groups.
100% of relevant applications are supported by a Statement of Community Involvement produced by the applicant.

100% attendance at joint working groups.
Target met

Footnotes

[Footnote 8] For the purpose of the waste needs assessment this includes composting and transfer facilities.

[Footnote 9] Based on all major waste streams sent for disposal.

[Footnote 10] Based on C, D & E waste arisings sent for recovery to land.

[Footnote 11] Based on National Indicator 192 calculation methodology, plus recovered street sweepings and recovered wood waste.

[Footnote 12] Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) (2010) 'Survey of Commercial and Industrial Waste Arisings 2010', December 2010.

[Footnote 13] Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) (2014) 'New Methodology to Estimate Waste Generation by the Commercial & Industrial Sector in England', August 2014.

[Footnote 14] Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG): Survey of Arisings & Use of Construction & Demolition Waste as Aggregate in England: 2005.

[Footnote 15] Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) (2012) 'Methodology for estimating annual waste generation from the Construction, Demolition & Excavation (CD&E) Sectors in England'

[Footnote 16] C&I and CD&E waste are estimates only.

[Footnote 17] Includes Special Areas of Conservation (SAC), Special Protection Areas (SPA), RAMSAR sites, Areas of Outstanding natural Beauty (AONB), Sites of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), Scheduled Monuments and Registered Parks and Gardens.

Monitoring and enforcement

Highlights

  • During 2020/21 the Monitoring and Enforcement Team made a total of 68 scheduled visits to minerals or waste management sites. Unfortunately, due to the Coronavirus pandemic, the number of visits was greatly reduced from previous years but will increase again for 2021/22.
  • The team made 19 visits in response to complaints about unauthorised development as well as other non-scheduled visits to previously identified sites involving unauthorised waste management development.
  • Complex planning audits continue and are being maintained for all permitted mineral waste management development, enabling the MWPA to regulate planning conditions and development.
  • The team continues to address challenging issues when investigating or taking enforcement action against breaches of planning control.
  • Examples of successful enforcement action and ongoing challenges are provided below.

Figure 6: Unauthorised development where mixed waste was imported, deposited, stored and burnt, with inert waste comprising soils and hardcore being spread of the land.

Figure 7: Unauthorised disposal of inert waste on land without owner's knowledge

Monitoring

As a result of internal re-organisation within the department, Development Management Officers (planners dealing with applications), took over the dedicated monitoring (on a trial basis) of authorised of minerals and waste management sites which benefitted from planning permission. Enforcement Officers continued to deal wholly with the investigation and enforcement relating to unauthorised development.

Strategic Objectives:

  • To strengthen the Planning Officers' understanding of the operational side of the mineral and waste industry which assists in dealing with applications.
  • Improve their understanding of unauthorised minerals and waste management development and address as required.
  • To monitor and ensure compliance with conditions attached to planning permissions.
  • To take enforcement action, if expedient, where breaches of planning control have occurred.
  • Checking the performance of the operating companies.
  • Observing site development and operations to maintain planning control.
  • Assessing the effectiveness of planning conditions.
  • Maintaining records of development progress.

The monitoring of authorised sites serves several purposes, including:

  • Checking the performance of the operating companies.
  • Observing site development and operations to maintain planning control.
  • Assessing the effectiveness of planning conditions.
  • Maintaining records of development progress.

Site visits

Site visits are also undertaken to investigate and monitor unauthorised development, which may result in enforcement action being taken.

During 2020/21, a total of 68 scheduled site visits were made. The number of complaints/enquiries refer to both permitted and unauthorised sites [footnote 18].

Table 23: Number of site visits and complaints investigated by Surrey County Council Planning Enforcement Officers

Type of Visit2015/162016/172017/182018/192019/202020/21
Scheduled visits and site monitoring 377 390 359 356 176 68
Non-scheduled site visits generated by complaint investigation or ad-hoc monitoring 42 142 97 43 40 19
Total visits 419 532 456 399 216 87
Number of complaint/enquiries 63 90 86 77 56 69

Of the 69 complaints received in 2020/21: 24 were referred to other appropriate regulatory authorities (i.e., the relevant borough/district councils, EA or the Police) and the remaining 45 complaints dealt with by County Enforcement Officers involved liaison with both Local Planning Authorities (district and borough councils) and the EA.

The EA was made aware of all sites pre- or post- investigation. A total of 26 site visits were conducted, mostly to sites involving unauthorised waste management development. The remaining complaints were either resolved through dialogue with site operators or became the subject of ongoing investigation and negotiation.

The MWPA is empowered by regulation [footnote 19] to charge for site visits whilst monitoring and enforcing the conditions governing mineral permissions. This additional financial resource has enabled Officers to complete complex planning audits on all mineral sites. Nearly all authorised waste sites also underwent a similar planning audit, which has improved the MWPA's ability to regulate sites with planning permission.

The Enforcement and Monitoring Team continues to investigate complaints, relating almost exclusively to waste activity, including unauthorised land-raising through the deposit of waste soils and disposal of non-inert waste through burning.

Figure 8: Shows unauthorised Landraising

Figure 8 shows unauthorised land raising of a field which is within eight metres of a watercourse and impeding the flood plain, which resulted in the works being stopped and has led to a retrospective planning application being submitted and withdrawn. A different planning application to retain most of the raised area, but to remove and relocate the soils that are too close to the watercourse to elsewhere on the property, is due to be submitted in 2021.

In 2020/21 the Monitoring and Enforcement Team continued to deal with complex and challenging issues when investigating or taking enforcement action against breaches of planning control:

  • Epsom Chalk Pit, College Road, Epsom – A planning application to redevelop a site which benefits from a lawful use for waste separation and transfer into a waste recovery facility involving mechanical processing was complicated by the operator commencing development, creating noise and dust impacts, prior to its determination. In addition, in February, a fire started on site (when the site was closed), which resulted in the fire brigade attending and neighbour concerns were exacerbated as a result of noxious smoke from the fire. These activities resulted in County Planning Officers, Environmental Health Officers from Epsom and Ewell Borough Council and the EA working together, and it was the EA that led discussions with the operator to address the above issues and the requirements of the EA permit under which the site operates. The relevant application (Ref. EP21/00223/CMA) was reported to Surrey County Council's Planning and Regulatory Committee on 23 February 2022 who resolved to grant planning permission for the development proposed. However, before issuing the relevant decision notice the MWPA is consulting with the Secretary of State.
  • Stanwell Quarry, southern perimeter Road, Heathrow – Unauthorised development comprising a zap shelter and portacabins was raised with the operator and a retrospective planning application was submitted and is being dealt with.

Examples of successful enforcement action and ongoing challenges include:

  • Oak Tree Farm (AKA Evergreen Farm), Partridge Lane, Newdigate – After joint investigation and site visits, an Enforcement Notice was issued that addressed mixed use planning breaches, comprising both district and county planning matters. The MWPA supported the Mole Valley District Council's enforcement action at the online appeal in June 2021 and a decision was issued in July 2021. The appeal was partially successful in terms of the retention of some buildings, but the waste management development has to cease and be removed from the land.
  • Brick Kiln Copse, Old Lane, Ockham – An Enforcement Notice was issued in September 2020 to address an unauthorised aggregate recycling facility that had gained the benefit of an Environmental permit from the EA. An appeal has been made against the notice and will be determined by the Planning Inspectorate in 2022.
  • Wrays Farm (AKA Ridgeways Farm), Lonesome Lane, Reigate – A second bite Enforcement Notice was not issued as anticipated as a result of Data Protection issues which proved difficult to overcome and progress was further complicated by the effects of the Coronavirus pandemic.
  • Dean Oak Farm, Leigh – Following the unauthorised raising of land that also impedes the flood plain, a satisfactory retrospective planning application to address the development has yet to be submitted. Dialogue continues and an application is now anticipated in 2022.
  • Hathersham Lane, Smallfield – Discussion has been ongoing, but a satisfactory retrospective planning application to address an unauthorised soil and aggregate recycling operation with an additional scrap metal use, has still to be submitted. Dialogue continues, and it is anticipated that an application that can be validated will be submitted and processed in 2021.
  • Birchen Wood Farm, West Park Road, Newchapel – Unauthorised landraising took place on land that had the benefit of planning permission from Tandridge District Council for a soil bund on a track, this resulted in the issuance of a Planning Contravention Notice to the landowner who was living in Spain, and an Enforcement Notice requiring the removal of the imported waste soils will be issued in 2022.
  • Acre Farm, Hare Lane, Blindley Heath – A Temporary Stop Notice was issued in March 2021 to address both the unauthorised importation, deposit and storage of mixed inert waste soils and hardcore on the land. The landowner, who appears to be a victim of crime, is in discussion with the MWPA as to the future clearance of the waste from the land.
  • Hedgehog Field, Dowlands Lane, Copthorne - Following the unauthorised landraising and construction of a soil bund around the site, and the disposal of a small volume of asbestos and green waste, an Enforcement Notice was issued in March 2021. The notice requires the removal of all imported waste soils, asbestos and green waste, and to return the field to its previous condition.
  • Honeycrock Farm, Green Lane, Salfords – Action against the unauthorised use of an area of the site for mixed waste import with disposal by burning, and the import of landscaping waste for both disposal by burning and storage, was commenced through the issue of Planning Contravention Notices in March 2021.
  • Land south of Newchapel Road, Lingfield - A Temporary Stop Notice was issued in March 2021 to address both the unauthorised importation, deposit, storage and disposal by burning of both mixed waste and the unauthorised import and spreading of inert waste soils and hardcore on the land. Importation ceased and clearance of the site commenced shortly after service.
  • Randalls Nursery, Lyne – An unauthorised skip yard had been set up, and was found to be undertaking the separation of waste and the disposal by burning of mixed waste. A Planning Contravention Notice was issued and the landowners have removed the tenant, the activity has ceased and waste is to be removed from the site.

Many other sites of a similar nature are dealt with through negotiations each year, without the need to take formal enforcement action, to cease unauthorised waste management development: whether it be non-inert or inert, disposal, recycling through a range of processes or simply storage of waste.

Footnotes

[Footnote 20] Surrey County Council Planning Enforcement Officers' site visit & complaint logs.

[Footnote 21] The Town and Country Planning (Fees for Applications and Deemed Applications) (Amendment) (England) Regulations 2006.

Decision making

Highlights

  • In 2020/21 the Planning service received 52 valid minerals and waste management planning applications and 53 county development (Reg. 3) planning applications.
  • During 2020/21 46 decisions for minerals and waste management development and 48 for county development were issued.

Validating applications

In accordance with national guidance, the Minerals and Waste Planning Authorities (MWPAs) Validation Checklist helps applicants to provide information that enables Surrey County Council to register, assess and determine planning applications in a timely way.

The MWPA is reviewing the checklist to ensure that it remains fit for purpose.

Minerals and waste valid applications

During 2020/21 52 valid planning applications were received, and 19 further planning applications were received for non‑material amendments to existing planning permissions [footnote 20]. The number of valid applications received annually between 2009/10 and 2020/21 is illustrated in Figure 9.

Figure 9: Number of valid planning applications for minerals and waste development received by Surrey County Council between 2009/10 to 2020/21

In 2020/21 Surrey County Council validated 52 minerals and waste related applications. This is a similar amount compared to the previous two monitoring years.

Minerals and waste decisions

A total of 46 decisions were issued during 2020/21. Appendix 1 provides details of these decisions.

19 further decisions were issued for non‑material amendments to existing planning permissions.

Figure 10: Number of decisions issued on Minerals and Waste applications received between 2009/10 to 2020/21.

In 2020/21 Surrey County Council made a total of 46 decision in relation to minerals and waste development.

Of the 46 decisions made relating to minerals and waste management development in 2020/21, six were made by committee and 40 were made under delegated powers.

County development (Regulation 3) valid applications

During 2020/21, Surrey County Council received 53 valid planning applications. 3 further valid planning applications for non‑material amendments to existing planning permissions were also received. There was a significant decrease in the number of planning applications received by SCC between the monitoring periods 2019/20 to 2020/21. It is likely that this is due to the effects of the Coronavirus pandemic.

Figure 11: Number of valid planning applications for the county council development received by Surrey County Council between 2009/10 to 2020/21

In 2020/21 53 regulation 3 related applications were validated by Surrey County Council.

County development (Regulation 3) decisions issued

A total of 48 decisions were issued during 2020/21.

Five further decisions were issued for non‑material amendments to existing planning permissions.

Figure 12: Number of decisions issued on County Development Applications received by Surrey County Council between 2009/10 to 2020/21

In 2020/21 Surrey County Council made 48 regulation 3 related planning decisions.

During 2020/21, three decisions on county development applications were made by committee.

Footnotes

[Footnote 22] An application is only registered as a valid application if it is accompanied by the correct fee, plans and certificates and is adequately described and detailed. The term 'applications' includes applications for planning permission and submissions for approval of details pursuant to conditions (Article 21 submissions), Minerals Review and IDO submissions.

Appendix 1: Minerals and waste planning decisions issued 2020 to 2021

Elmbridge

Application Number Site AddressProposalDecision Date of Decision
EL18/3802

Weybridge Skip Hire
Unit 11 and 12 Wintersells Road, Byfleet, West Byfleet, Surrey, KT14 7LF Change of use to a waste transfer station and recycling facility (sui generis) for the receipt and treatment of mixed, dry, non-hazardous household, industrial and commercial and construction, demolition and excavation waste, including the demolition of the existing building at Unit 11 and the erection of a steel portal framed building, picking station, storage bays and boundary fencing. Granted 29/06/2020

Epsom and Ewell

Application Number Site AddressProposalDecision Date of Decision

GU20/CON/00050

The Drift Golf Club

The Drift Golf Club, The Drift, East Horsley, Surrey, KT24 5HD

Details of Solar Panels submitted pursuant to Condition 24 of planning permission ref: GU14/P/01718 dated 23 February 2018. Approved 09/11/2020

GU20/CON/00018

J Gunner & Company Ltd

Sunnyside, Aldershot Road, Worplesdon, GU3 3HF Details of a Construction Transport Management Plan pursuant to Condition 4 and Drainage Plan pursuant to Condition 11 of planning permission ref: GU19/CON/00028 dated 10 December 2019. Approved 24/06/2020

Mole Valley

Application Number Site AddressProposalDecision Date of Decision

MO/2020/0986

Dungates Farms Ltd

Park Pit, Reigate Road, Buckland, RH3 7BE

Detailed design of fish tank, including associated viewing platform design pursuant to Condition 15 of planning permission ref: MO/2017/1797 dated 30 May 2018.

Approved 03/08/2020

MO/2020/0685

Dungates Farms Ltd

Park Pit, Reigate Road, Buckland, RH3 7BE

Details of Access Arrangements pursuant to Condition 12 of planning permission ref: MO/2017/1797 dated 30 May 2018.

Approved 09/06/2020
MO/2020/0702

Dungates Farms Ltd
Park Pit, Reigate Road, Buckland, RH3 7BE Details of a Landscape and Ecology Management Plan pursuant to Condition 11 of planning permission ref: MO/2017/1797 dated 30 May 2018. Approved 16/04/2020

Reigate and Banstead

Application Number Site AddressProposalDecision Date of Decision

RE20/01859/CON

Mr West

2 Perrylands Lane, Horley, RH6 9PR

Erection of 4 metre high acoustic enclosure around the screening/crushing area.

Granted 26/08/2020

RE20/00534/CON

SUEZ Recycling and Recovery Ltd

Earlswood Materials Bulking Facility, Horley Road, Redhill, RH1 6PN

Operation of the Earlswood Materials Bulking Facility for the importation, bulking, storage and transfer of waste, weighbridge office and two weighbridges, external covered bulking bays with hardstanding area, all accessed via the existing Earlswood Depot.

Granted 05/03/2020

RE20/00548/CON

Britaniacrest Recycling Ltd

Land at Hookwood Waste Management Centre, 24-26 Reigate Road, Horley, RH6 0HJ

Extension of an existing materials recycling/recovery building to allow for the internal reconfiguration of the recycling/recovery plant and machinery, and to allow for internal stockpiling of unprocessed waste.

Granted 05/03/2020

RE19/02612/CON

Mr West

2 Perrylands Lane, Horley, RH6 9PR

The continued use of land as a soil processing facility, utilising imported builders' construction and demolition waste, including: the siting of a screener, single storey Portakabin, portaloo, two metal containers, concrete hardstanding, stockpiles of soils and rubble, perimeter soil bunds, lighting, water mist sprinklers, access gates, wheel wash, and the provision of car parking and fuel storage without compliance with Conditions 2, 6 and 9 of planning permission ref: RE15/02426/CON dated 25 February 2016 to allow for the crushing of brick, concrete and stone.

Granted 20/03/2020

RE20/00286/CON

Horse Hill Developments Ltd

Horse Hill Well Site, Horse Hill, Hookwood, Horley, Surrey RH6 0HN

Details of a Surface Water Drainage Scheme submitted pursuant to Condition 24 of planning permission ref: RE18/02667/CON dated 27 September 2019.

Approved 31/03/2020

RE19/02500/CON

Horse Hill Developments Ltd

Horse Hill Well Site, Horse Hill, Hookwood, Horley, Surrey RH6 0HN

Details of a Transport and Traffic Management Plan submitted pursuant to Condition 8 of planning permission ref: RE18/02667/CON dated 27 September 2019.

Approved 30/01/2020

RE19/02495/CON

Horse Hill Developments Ltd

Horse Hill Well Site, Horse Hill, Hookwood, Horley, Surrey RH6 0HN

Details of a Noise Monitoring Plan submitted pursuant to Condition 11 of planning permission ref: RE18/02667/CON dated 27 September 2019.

Approved 29/01/2020

Runnymede

Application Number Site AddressProposalDecision Date of Decision

RU.19/0535

Severn Trent Green Power

Trumps Farm Anaerobic Digestion Facility, Kitsmead Lane, Longcross, Surrey KT16 0EF

The construction and operation of a) an anaerobic digestion facility and b) a wood drying and pelleting facility without compliance with Condition 3 of planning permission ref: RU.15/1366 dated 26 November 2015 to extend the hours of operation from 0730 - 1800 hours to 0600 - 2000 hours Monday to Friday, only for vehicles involved in the export of digestate from the site.

Granted 27/06/2019

Spelthorne

Application Number Site AddressProposalDecision Date of Decision

SP20/01504/SCC

Brett Aggregates Ltd

Land at Queen Mary Quarry, West of Queen Mary Reservoir, Ashford Road, Laleham, Staines, TW18 1QF

The temporary installation of a mobile contractor's caravan. Granted 30/11/2020

Tandridge

Application Number Site AddressProposalDecision Date of Decision

TA/2019/2147

J & J Franks Ltd

Mercers South Quarry, Bletchingley Road, Nutfield, RH1 4EU

The extraction and screening of sand from Mercers South with progressive restoration to agriculture using inert waste materials, together with associated infrastructure, on a site of 52.2ha and the temporary diversion of public footpath 173 for the duration of the operations without compliance with Condition 8 of planning permission ref: TA/2019/34 dated 6 June 2019 so as to allow revision to the numbers of HGV movements.

Granted 26/11/2019

TA/2019/690

SCC Property

Land at and adjoining the Former Downs Residential Site, Tupwood Lane, Caterham, CR3 6ET

Remediation, restoration (re-contouring and planting) and change of use of land to open countryside.

Granted

04/04/2019

TA/2020/1418

Southern Gravel Ltd

Oxted Quarry. Chalkpit Lane, Oxted, RH8 0QW

Details of a Written Cleaning Procedure submitted pursuant to Condition 17 of planning permission ref: TA/2012/902 dated 21 November 2018.

Approved 05/08/2020

TA2020/575

R Exall and Sons

Land adjoining Willetts Cottage, Croydon Barn Lane, Horne, South Godstone, Surrey RH9 8JP

Details of a Dust Management Plan submitted pursuant to Condition 4 of planning permission ref: TA/2019/1052 dated 10 September 2019.

Approved 11/05/2020

TA2020/569

R Exall and Sons

Land adjoining Willetts Cottage, Croydon Barn Lane, Horne, South Godstone, Surrey RH9 8JP Details of a Surface Water Drainage Scheme submitted pursuant to Condition 2 of planning permission ref: TA/2019/1052 dated 10 September 2019. Approved 11/05/2020

TA/2020/211

Southern Gravel Ltd

Land at Oxted Quarry, Chalkpit Lane, Oxted RH8 0QN

Details of additional chalk stores and use of a mobile chalk screener pursuant to Condition 10 of planning permission Ref: TA93/0765 dated 11 June 1997.

Approved 09/03/2020

Waverley

Application Number Site AddressProposalDecision Date of Decision

WA/2020/1463

SUEZ Recycling and Recovery UK

Land at Runfold South Quarry, Guildford Road, Runfold, Farnham, Surrey GU10 1PB

The temporary installation of a portable contractor's office and mess cabin, two portable office units, two toilet units, and four storage containers (part retrospective).

Granted 23/09/2020

WA/2020/0020

Broadwater Park Golf Club

Broadwater Park Golf Club, Meadrow, Godalming, GU7 3BU

Details of a Landfill Gas Management Plan pursuant to Condition 13(c) of planning permission ref: WA/2018/0097 dated 16 April 2019.

Approved 17/03/2020

Woking

Application Number Site AddressProposalDecision Date of Decision

WO/PLAN/2020/0454

Brookwood Park Ltd

Brookwood Cemetery, Cemetery Pales, Brookwood, Woking GU24 0BL

Details of Land Stability Risk Assessment pursuant to Condition 4 and Engineering Earthworks Specification and Method Statement pursuant to Condition 5 of planning permission ref: WO/2018/0890 dated 30 January 2019.

Approved 08/05/2020

Appendix 2: Minerals and waste sites in Surrey

Elmbridge

Map Reference Site Name and AddressActivityOperator
EL01

Silvermere Haven Pet Cemetery, Byfleet Road, Cobham

Clinical Waste Treatment

Mrs P Thompson

EL02

Weylands Treatment Works, Molesey Road, Walton-on-Thames

Waste Transfer Station, Materials Recovery Facility

General Demolition Ltd

EL03

Unit 10, Wintersells Road, Byfleet

Waste Transfer Station

PM Skips Limited
EL04

Molesey Reservoirs, Hurst Road, West Molesey

Aftercare Island Barn Aggregate
EL05

Esher Water Pollution Control Works, Farm Road, Esher

Sewage Treatment Works Thames Water
EL06 Weybridge Sewage Treatment Works Sewage Treatment Works Thames Water

Epsom and Ewell

Map Reference Site Name and AddressActivityOperator
EP01 Mid-Surrey Farm, 133 Reigate Road, Ewell Composting Surrey Green Waste Limited
EP02

Epsom Community Recycling Centre (CRC) and Waste Transfer Station (WTS), Blenheim Road, Epsom

CRC and Waste Transfer Station

Suez Recycling & Recovery Surrey Ltd

EP03 Epsom Skip Hire, The Chalk Pit, College Road, Epsom Waste Transfer Station Epsom Skip Hire Ltd
EP04 Abal Waste, The Chalk Pit, College Road, Epsom Material Recovery Facility Abal Waste Ltd
EP05 1st Place Skips, Epsom Chalk Pit, College Road, Epsom Waste Transfer Station 1st Place Skips

Guildford

Map Reference Site Name and AddressActivityOperator
GU01

Guildford Metal Exchange, 14 Westfield Road, Slyfield Industrial Estate

Metal Recycling Sites (including ELV)

Guildford Metal Exchange LtdGU02

GU02

Sunnyside, Clasford Bridge, Aldershot Road, Worplesdon

Materials Recovery and Aggregate Recycling

J Gunner & Co Ltd

GU03

Land at Home Farm, Bypass Road, Shackleford

Restoration

Tarmac Trading Limited

GU05

Land at Lynchford Farm, Farnborough

Materials Recovery Facility, Waste Transfer Station, Aggregates Recycling

Econometric Ltd

GU06

Land at Strawberry Farm, Glaziers Lane, Normandy

Soil Recycling Facility

CP Backhurst & Co Ltd

GU07

2020 Recycling Ltd, Chapel Farm, Guildford Road, Normandy

Materials Recovery Facility

2020 Recycling Ltd

GU08

Repairable Vehicles Ltd, Chapel Farm, Guildford Road, Normandy

Metal Recycling Sites (including ELV)

Repairable Vehicles Ltd

GU10

Guildford CRC & WTS, Moorfield Road, Slyfield Industrial Estate,

Community Recycling Centre and Waste Transfer Station

SITA Surrey Ltd

GU12

Jury Farm, Ripley Lane, West Horsley

Composting

Mr J Quinn

GU13

Seale Lodge Sandpit & Landfill, Seale Lane, Seale

Restoration

SITA Surrey Ltd
GU14

Albury Landfill, Shere Road, Albury

Restoration SITA Surrey Ltd
GU15

20-24 Westfield Road, Slyfield Industrial Estate, Guildford

Material Recovery Facility and Aggregates recycling

Chambers Waste Management PLC

GU16

Ash Vale Transfer Station, Station Road West, Ash Vale

Waste Transfer Station

SITA UK Ltd

GU18

Land at Albury Wellsite, Albury Park, East of New Road, Albury

Oil & Gas Production

Island Gas Ltd

GU19

Guildford Sewage Treatment Works, Slyfield Industrial Estate

Sewage Treatment Works Thames Water
GU20

Ash Vale Sewage Treatment Works, Meadow Close, Ash Vale

Sewage Treatment Works Thames Water
GU21

Wisley Sewage Treatment Works, Wisley Lane, Wisley

Sewage Treatment Works Thames Water
GU22

Ripley Sewage Treatment Works, Newark Lane, Ripley

Sewage Treatment Works Thames Water
GU23

Godalming Sewage Treatment Works

Sewage Treatment Works Thames Water

Mole Valley

Map Reference Site Name and AddressActivityOperator
MO03

Clockhouse Brickworks, Horsham Road, Capel

Awaiting Restoration.

Hanson Building Products

MO04

Dorking CRC, Ranmore Road, Dorking

Community Recycling Centre

SITA Surrey Ltd
MO05

Dorking West Station Yard, Ranmore Road, Dorking

Metal Recycling Sites (including ELV)

LJC Auto Spares

MO06

Leatherhead CRC and WTS, Randalls Road, Leatherhead

Community Recycling Centre and Waste Transfer Station

SITA Surrey Ltd
MO08

Unit 2 Plough Industrial Estate, Kingston Road, Leatherhead

Materials Recycling Facility and Aggregates Recycling

D&E Roberts
MO09

Randalls Road MRF, Randalls Road, Leatherhead

Materials Recovery Facility

Grundon Waste Management Ltd

MO10

Reigate Road MRF, Reigate Road, Betchworth

Material Recovery Facility and Aggregates Recycling

J & J Franks Ltd

MO11

Swires Farm, Henfold Lane, Capel

Composting Ford Farms Ltd
MO12

Tapwood Quarry, Reigate Road, Buckland

Restoration

Hanson Quarry Products Europe Ltd

MO14

South Holmwood Brickworks (including Beare Green Brickworks), Newdigate Road, Beare Green

Clay working / brickworks

Ibstock Bricks Ltd

MO15

Ewhurst Brickworks, Horsham Road, Walliswood

Clay working / brickworks

Wienerberger Ltd

MO16

Auclaye Brickworks, Horsham Road, Capel

Clay working / brickworks (Inactive) and Recovery to Land

N. Marshall

MO17

Brockham Wellsite, Felton's Farm, Bushbury Lane, Brockham

Oil & Gas Production

Angus Energy Plc
MO18

Clockhouse Landfill, Horsham Road, Capel

Awaiting Restoration

Lone Star
MO19

Dorking Sewage Treatment Works, Pixham Lane, Dorking

Sewage Treatment Works

Thames Water
MO20

Leatherhead Sewage Treatment Works, Randalls Road

Sewage Treatment Works

Thames Water
MO21

Holmwood Sewage Treatment Works, Henfold Lane, South Holmwood

Sewage Treatment Works

Thames Water
MO22

Headley Sewage Treatment Works

Sewage Treatment Works

Thames Water
MO23

Forest Green Sewage Treatment Works

Sewage Treatment Works

Southern Water
MO24

Oakley West Sewage Treatment Works

Sewage Treatment Works

Southern Water
MO25

Oakley East Sewage Treatment Works

Sewage Treatment Works

Southern Water
MO26

Coldharbour Waste Water Treatment Works

Sewage Treatment Works

Southern Water

Reigate and Banstead

Map Reference Site Name and AddressActivityOperator
RE01

West View, Brighton Road, Lower Kingswood

Metal Recycling Sites (including ELV)

E&S B Davis

RE02

Patteson Court Landfill, Cormongers Lane, Nutfield

Non Hazardous Landfill and Soil Recycling Facility

Biffa Waste Services Ltd

RE03

Horse Hill Well Site, Horse Hill, Hookwood

Oil & Gas Appraisal/Exploration

Horse Hill Developments Ltd

RE04

Earlswood CRC, Horley Road, Earlswood

Community Recycling Centre

SITA Surrey Ltd
RE05

Earlswood Materials Bulking Facility, Horley Road, Earlswood

Waste Transfer Station

SUEZ Recycling and Recovery
RE07

Unit 11, Ormside Way, Holmethorpe Industrial Estate, Redhill

Material Recovery Facility

Enlightened Lamp Recycling Ltd

RE08

2 Perrylands Lane Perrylands Lane, Smallfield

Aggregates Recycling

Motion Skip & Grab Hire

RE09

Little Orchard Farm, Reigate Road, Hookwood

Materials Recovery Facility and Aggregates Recycling

Britaniacrest Recycling Ltd

RE10

Salfords Rail Depot, Southern Avenue, Salfords

Rail Aggregate Depot (Inactive), Waste Transfer Station and Aggregates Recycling

Day Aggregates

RE11

Copyhold Works, Nutfield Road, Redhill

Awaiting Restoration

Evonik

RE12

Merstham Sewage Treatment Works, Albury Road, South Merstham

Sewage Treatment Works Thames Water
RE13

Lee Street Sewage Treatment Works, Lee Street, Horley

Sewage Treatment Works Thames Water
RE14

Earlswood Sewage Treatment Works, Woodhatch Road, Earlswood

Sewage Treatment Works Thames Water
RE15

Ironsbottom Sewage Treatment Works

Sewage Treatment Works Thames Water

Runnymede

Map Reference Site Name and AddressActivityOperator
RU01

Addlestone Quarry, Byfleet Road, New Haw

Sand & Gravel Extraction, Aggregates Recycling and Recovery to Land

Cappagh
RU03

Fairfields, Free Prae Road, Chertsey

Metal Recycling Sites (including ELV)

Messrs F & P Placito

RU04

Trumps Farm, Kitsmead Lane, Egham

Composting

Collier Environmental Services Ltd

RU05

Trumps Farm AD, Kitsmead Lane, Egham

Anaerobic Digestion

Severn Trent Green Power

RU06

Lyne CRC, Lyne Lane, Chertsey

Community Recycling Centre

SITA Surrey Ltd
RU07

Norlands Lane Landfill Site, Norlands Lane, Egham

Aftercare

Viridor Waste Management Ltd

RU09

Land at Coldharbour Lane, Thorpe

Inert Landfill & Restoration

CEMEX Materials Ltd

RU10

Land at Capital House, Woodham Park Road, Woodham

Materials Recycling Facility & Aggregates Recycling

Capital Recycling Limited

RU14

Chertsey Sewage Treatment Works, Lyne Lane, Chertsey

Sewage Treatment Works

Thames Water

Spelthorne

Map Reference Site Name and AddressActivityOperator
SP01

Charlton Lane Eco Park, Charlton Lane, Shepperton

Community Recycling Centre, Waste Transfer Station, Anaerobic Digestion and Energy Recovery Facility

SUEZ Recycling and Recovery

SP02

Hengrove Farm & Hengrove Park, London Road, Staines

Recovery to Land

Henry Streeter (Sand & Ballast) Ltd

SP03

Hithermoor Quarry, Leylands Lane, Stanwell Moor

Recovery to Land & Aggregates Recycling

Brett Aggregates Ltd

SP04

Home Farm & Shepperton Quarry, Littleton Lane, Shepperton

Sand & Gravel Extraction, Inert landfill and Aggregates recycling

Shepperton Aggregates & Killoughery Waste Management

SP05

Homers Farm, London Road (A30), Staines

Sand & Gravel Extraction and Processing, Recovery to Land

Harleyford Aggregates Ltd

SP06

Land at 111 Windmill Road, Windmill Road Business Park, Sunbury on Thames

Waste Transfer Station

European Asbestos Services Ltd

SP07

Land at Bugle Nurseries, Upper Halliford Road, Shepperton

Materials Recovery Facility

Bugle Nurseries

SP08

Oakleaf Farm, Horton Road, Stanwell Moor

Materials Recovery Facility; Other Recovery

Charles Morris Fertilizers Ltd

SP09

Shepperton Quarry, Littleton Lane, Shepperton

Sand & Gravel Extraction, Recovery to Land and Aggregates recycling

Shepperton Aggregates & Killoughery Waste Management

SP10

Stanwell Quarry, Stanwell Moor Road, Stanwell

Recovery to Land & Aggregates Recycling

Cappagh

SP12

Manor Farm Quarry, Ashford Rd & Worple Rd, Laleham

Recovery to Land

Brett Aggregates Ltd

SP13

Queen Mary Reservoir & Land West of QMR, Ashford Road, Staines

Sand & Gravel Extraction, Recovery to land and Aggregates Recycling

Brett Aggregates Ltd

SP14

Stanwell Recycling, Stanwell Moor

Aggregates Recycling & Recovery to Land

CEMEX UK Operations Limited

SP15

Lower Mill Farm, Stanwell Moor

Aftercare  
SP16

Ivydene Cottage, Charlton Lane, Shepperton, Surrey, TW17 8QA

Re-use Facility

SUEZ Recycling and Recovery Ltd

Surrey Heath

Map Reference Site Name and AddressActivityOperator
SU01

Chobham Car Spares, Clearmount, Burrow Hill, Chobham

Metal Recycling Sites (including LV)

Chobham Car Spares Ltd

SU02

Ecovert Ltd, 14 Doman Road, Camberley

Waste Transfer Station

Amey L G Ltd

SU03

Bluebell Copse, Hook Mill Lane, Windlesham

Green Waste Composting

Duncan Groundworks Ltd

SU04

The Compost Centre, Priest Lane, West End

Composting

Harrington & Jessup Ltd

SU05

Bagshot CRC, Swift Lane, Bagshot

Community Recycling Centre

SITA Surrey Ltd

SU06

Camberley CRC, Wilton Road, Camberley

Community Recycling Centre

SITA Surrey Ltd

SU07

Camberley Sewage Treatment Works, Doman Road, Camberley

Sewage Treatment Works, Sludge Treatment

Thames Water
SU08

Chobham Sewage Treatment Works

Sewage Treatment Works

Thames Water
SU09

Lightwater Sewage Treatment Works

Sewage Treatment Works

Thames Water

Tandridge

Map Reference Site Name and AddressActivityOperator
TA01

Oxted Sandpit, Barrow Green Road, Oxted

Recovery to Land (Inactive)

Killoughery Waste Management

TA02

Warlingham CRC, Bond Road, Warlingham

Community Recycling Centre

SITA Surrey Ltd

TA03

Hays Bridge Farm, Brickhouse Lane, South Godstone

Materials Recovery Facility & Metal Recycling Sites (including ELV)

EGAP Development Ltd

TA04

Surrey Pet Cemetery, Byers Lane, South Godstone

Clinical Waste Treatment

Surrey Pet Cemetery Ltd

TA05

Caterham CRC, Chaldon Road, Caterham

Community Recycling Centre

SITA Surrey Ltd

TA06

Oxted Quarry Landfill, Chalk Pit Lane, Oxted

Chalk extraction (Inactive) and Recovery to Land

Southern Gravel Ltd

TA07

Normans Corner, Chapel Road, Smallfield

Materials Recovery Facility & Aggregate Recycling

R & S Etherington Ltd

TA08

Land adjoining Willetts Cottage, Croydon Barn Lane, South Godstone

Material Recovery Facility

R Exall and Sons

TA10

Unit 35, Hobbs Industrial Estate, Eastbourne Road, Newchapel

Materials Recovery Facility

Jacques Plant Hire Ltd

TA11

Mercers South Quarry, Nutfield, Redhill, Surrey, RH1 4EU

Soft Sand Extraction and Processing, Inert Landfill and Recovery to Land

J & J Franks Ltd

TA12

Unit 8, Shawlands Court, Newchapel Road, Lingfield

Waste Transfer Station

Wealden Services

TA13

Hillbury Farm, Tithepit Shaw Lane, Warlingham

Metal Recycling Sites (including ELV)

Mr D Caroline

TA14

North Park Quarry, North Park Lane, Godstone

Silica Sand Extraction and Processing and Soft Sand Extraction and Processing (Inactive)

Sibelco UK

TA15

Moorhouse Sandpits, Westerham Road, Limpsfield

Soft sand extraction & Processing and Soil Recycling Facility

Titsey Estates

TA16

Land North East of Pendell Farm, Pendell Road, Bletchingley

Silica Sand Extraction (inactive)

Sibelco UK

TA17

Kennel Farm, Outwood Lane, Bletchingley

Oil & Gas Production (Inactive)

Island Gas Ltd

TA18

Sugham Farm, Crowhurst Road, Lingfield

Oil & Gas (inactive)

Cuadrilla

TA19

Rooks Nest and Coney Hill Oil Wells (Palmers Wood Oil Field), off A22 Godstone Bypass, Godstone

Oil & Gas Production

Island Gas Ltd

TA20

Bletchingley Central Wellsite and Bletchingley 2 Wellsite, Kings Farm, Tilburstow Hill Road, South Godstone

Oil & Gas Appraisal/ Exploration (Inactive)

Island Gas Ltd

TA21

Lambs Brickworks, Terra Cotta Road, South Godstone

Recovery to Land

WT Lamb & Sons Ltd

TA25

Land at Brickhouse Farm, Brickhouse Lane, South Godstone

Metal Recycling Sites (including ELV)

Mr Wingham

TA26

Godstone Wastewater Treatment Works, Eastbourne Road, Godstone

Sewage Treatment Works Southern Water Services Ltd
TA27

Oxted Wastewater Treatment Works, Warren Lane, Hurst Green

Sewage Treatment Works Southern Water Services Ltd
TA28

Lingfield Wastewater Treatment Works, Crowhurst Road, Lingfield

Sewage Treatment Works Southern Water Services Ltd
TA29

Eden Vale Wastewater Treatment Works, Eden Vale, East Grinstead

Sewage Treatment Works Southern Water Services Ltd
TA30

Felbridge Wastewater Treatment Works, Eastbourne Road, Felbridge

Sewage Treatment Works Southern Water Services Ltd
TA31

Warwick Wold Sewage Transfer Works

Sewage Treatment Works Thames Water

Waverley

Map Reference Site Name and AddressActivityOperator
WA01

Copper Beeches, 1 School Hill, Wrecclesham

Metal Recycling Sites (including ELV)

T. Baker Jnr Ltd

WA02

Alton Road Sandpit, Alton Road, Wrecclesham

Non-Hazardous Landfill

Earthline Ltd

WA03

Bourne Mill CRC, Bourne Mil Industrial Estate, Guildford Road

Community Recycling Centre

SITA Surrey Ltd

WA04

Chiddingfold Storage Depot, Chiddingfold Road, Dunsfold, Godalming

Metal Recycling Sites (including ELV)

Refine Metals (UK) Ltd

WA05

Nanhurst Civic Amenity Site, Elmbridge Road, Cranleigh

Community Recycling Centre

SITA Surrey Ltd

WA06

Homefield Sandpit, Guildford Road, Runfold

Aggregates Recycling and Recovery to Land

Chambers Runfold PLC

WA07

Kill Copse, Willinghurst Estate, Guildford Road, Shamley Green

Aggregates Recycling

Guildford Tipper Hire Ltd
WA08

Runfold North, Guildford Road, Runfold

Aftercare

SUEZ Recycling and Recovery Ltd

WA09

Runfold South Quarry (Area A-C), Guildford Road, Runfold

Non-Hazardous Landfill

SITA UK Ltd

WA09

Runfold South Landfill and Quarry, Guildford Road, Runfold

Recovery to Land

R Collard Ltd

WA09

Runfold South Quarry Recycling Facility, Guildford Road, Runfold

Aggregates Recycling

SITA UK Ltd

WA10

Scrap Yard adjacent to Old Ewhurst Brickworks, Horsham Road, Walliswood

Metal Recycling Sites (including ELV)

Mr Marshall

WA11

Stockstone Quarry, Hyde Lane, Churt

Recovery to Land

T J Transport Ltd

WA12

Cranleigh Brickworks, Knowle Lane, Cranleigh

Clay working / brickworks (Inactive) and Recovery to Land

Cranleigh Brick & Tile Co.

WA13

Witley CRC, Petworth Road, Witley

Community Recycling Centre

SITA Surrey Ltd

WA14

Farnham Quarry, Runfold Roundabout, Badshot Lea

Restoration

Hanson Aggregates

WA15

Woodhill Sandpit, Shamley Green

Soft sand extraction & Inert Landfill (inactive) & Awaiting restoration

Mr Simms

WA16

Land at Dunsfold Park, Stovolds Hill, Cranleigh

Anaerobic Digestion

Rutland Ltd

WA17

Pitch Hill Quarry, Shere Road, Ewhurst

Awaiting Restoration

G.W. Verrall & Son

WA18

Farnham Sewage Treatment Works, Monkton Lane, Farnham

Sewage Treatment Works

Thames Water

WA19

Chiddingfold Sewage Treatment Works, Skinners Lane, Chiddingfold

Sewage Treatment Works

Southern Water Services Ltd

WA20

Cranleigh Sewage Treatment Works, Elmbridge Road, Cranleigh

Sewage Treatment Works

Thames Water Utilities Limited

WA21

Grayswood Sewage Treatment Works

Sewage Treatment Works

Southern Water Services Ltd

WA22

Elstead Sewage Treatment Works

Sewage Treatment Works

Thames Water

WA23

Haslemere Sewage Treatment Works

Sewage Treatment Works

Thames Water

WA24

Shamley Green Sewage Treatment Works

Sewage Treatment Works

Thames Water

Woking

Map Reference Site Name and AddressActivityOperator
WO01

Woking Rail Depot, Downside Goods Yard, Guildford Road, Woking

Rail Aggregate Depot

Day Aggregates

WO02

Martyrs Lane CRC, Martyrs Lane, Woking

Community Recycling Centre

SITA Surrey Ltd

WO04

Elm Nursery, Sutton Green Road, Woking

Green Waste Processing

Redwood Tree Services Ltd

WO05

Woking Sewage Treatment Works, Carters Lane, Woking

Sewage Treatment Works

Thames Water

WO06

Brookwood Cemetery, Cemetery Pales, Brookwood, Woking, Surrey GU24 0BL

Remediation and Processing

Brookwood Park Limited

Appendix 3: Materials recovered at Community Recycling Centres

Quantities of waste materials recovered at Community Recycling Centres in 2021

CommodityTonnes
Amenity Waste 8,081
Asbestos 46
Batteries - Cars 182
Batteries - Portable 45
Black Bag Waste 12,106
Books/Cassettes 8
Cardboard 4,603
Gas Bottles 145
Glass - Mixed 2
Green Waste 18,982
Gypsum 177
Hardcore (Reuse) 1,753
Hazardous Waste 23
Mattresses (Residual) 329
Metal Alloy 12
Metal Mixed 5,351
Mobile Phones, Spectacles, Print cartridges (Landfill Only) 2
Oil 128
Paper Mixed 1
Reuse 70
Tetrapaks 4
Textiles 876
Tyres 79
WEEE - Domestic Appliances 567
WEEE - Fluorescent Tubes 12
WEEE - Fridges and Freezers 464
WEEE - Small Mixed 2,486
WEEE - VDUs 885
Wire 109
Dirty Wood (Recovered) 15,070
Total 72,597

Reprocessor information for waste materials recovered at CRCs in 2021 (WasteDataFlow 2020)

CommodityReprocessor
Asbestos BIFFA Waste Services
Batteries - Car and Household G&P Batteries
Batteries - Mixed portables G&P Batteries
Black Bag Waste Grundon, Lakeside.
FCC Allington.
SITA, Mitcham.
Allington Quarry.
Stobart Biomass Tilbury.
RDF outside the UK but within Europe.
Books/Cassettes British Heart Foundation
Bric-a-brac SUEX Reuse Shops
Cans Thamesdown Recycling
Cardboard D S Smith.
SITA Trading, Various Locations.
Chemical Waste SITA Sittingbourne
Cooking oil Living Fuels Ltd
Engine Oil and Filters Associated Reclaimed Oil
Fluorescent Tubes Mercury Recycling Ltd
Food WASTE Agrivert.
Biogen (UK) Ltd
Fridges and Freezers EMR Ltd
Green Waste Woodhorn Group - Tangmere.
Woodhorn Group - Runcton.
Envar.
KPS Composting.
SITA, Packington.
Gas Cylinders and Fire Extinguishers BOC Ltd.
Brooksight Ltd.
Synergy Asset Services Ltd.
Glass Day Aggregates
General (Landfill) Waste Redhill Landfill.
SUEZ, Sidegate Lane.
Gypsum Countrystyle Recycling
Hard Mixed Plastics Seneca
Hardcore (Inert) R Collard - Runfold
Mattresses BIFFA Waste Services
Metal - Non Ferrous AJ & N Recycling Contractors Ltd
Metal - Ferrous/Mixed MDJ Light Bros.
Charles Muddle.
Total Metal Recycling.
Mixed Recyclables SITA Avonmouth.
SITA Landor Street.
James Waste Management.
SITA Mitcham.
Plastics - Mixed Thamesdown Recycling
Plastic and Cans Thamesdown Recycling
Road Sweepings Sweeptech
Small Recyclables Mobile Phone - Rainbow Trust.
Printer Cartridges - Empty Cartridges.
Recresco.
JMP Wilcox and Co Ltd
Tyres MDJ Light Bros, Credential PTL
WEEE - Large Domestic Appliances Sims Group UK Ltd (DHL Contract)
WEEE - Small Domestic Appliances and Monitors MDJ Light Bros (DHL Contract)
Wood Stobarts Wood Fuel